Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSimes, Jessica T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSakoda, Ryan T.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-27T15:52:22Z
dc.date.available2020-04-27T15:52:22Z
dc.date.issued2019-12-29
dc.identifier.citationJessica T. Simes, Ryan T. Sakoda. 2019. "Solitary Confinement and the U.S. Prison Boom." Criminal Justice Policy Review, https://doi.org/10.1177/0887403419895315
dc.identifier.issn0887-4034
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40374
dc.description.abstractSolitary confinement is a harsh form custody involving isolation from the general prison population and highly restricted access to visitation and programs. Using detailed prison records covering 30 years of practices in Kansas (1985–2014), we find solitary confinement is a normal event during imprisonment: 38 percent of whites and 46 percent of blacks experienced solitary confinement during their prison term. Long stays in solitary confinement were rare in the late 1980s with no detectable racial disparities, but a sharp increase in capacity after a new prison opening began an era of long-term isolation that most heavily impacted black young adults. A decomposition analysis indicates the increase in the length of stay in solitary confinement almost entirely explains the growth in the proportion of people held in solitary confinement. Our results provide new evidence of increasingly punitive prison conditions and previously unmeasured forms of inequality during the prison boom.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCriminal Justice Policy Review
dc.subjectCriminologyen_US
dc.subjectLawen_US
dc.subjectSolitary confinementen_US
dc.subjectPrison expansionen_US
dc.subjectRace and ethnicityen_US
dc.subjectCriminal justice policyen_US
dc.subjectPrison conditionsen_US
dc.titleSolitary confinement and the U.S. prison boomen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0887403419895315
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Sociologyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.date.online2019-12-29
dc.identifier.mycv337832


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record