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dc.contributor.authorGuyer, Jane I.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialWest Africaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-28T19:02:56Z
dc.date.available2020-04-28T19:02:56Z
dc.date.issued1978
dc.identifier.issn0281—6814
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40436
dc.descriptionAfrican Studies Center Working Paper No. 7en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper is an empirical study of the cultural context and historical development of the division of labor by sex in two farming systems of the West African cocoa belt: the Yoruba of Western Nigeria and the Beti of South-Central Cameroun. Both societies are patrilineal. Both peoples inhabited the forest zone before the period of colonial rule, so that their hoe-farming systems had already adjusted to the forest environment before the cocoa era. The two societies differ, however, in overall political structure. The Yoruba had a centralised form of city-state government, while the Beti were organised in small village communities under autonomous headmen. The major difference which forms the theme of this paper is the different division of labor by sex in the indigenous economy. In a rough categorization of African farming systems, according to which sex does most of the work, the Yoruba would be classified as a male farming system, the Beti as a female farming system. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston University, African Studies Centeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking Papers in African Studies; no. 7
dc.rightsCopyright © 1978, by the author.en_US
dc.subjectWest Africaen_US
dc.subjectCacao belten_US
dc.subjectCocoa beansen_US
dc.subjectAfrican farming systemsen_US
dc.subjectCameroonen_US
dc.subjectYorubaen_US
dc.subjectWomenen_US
dc.subjectNigeriaen_US
dc.subjectGender studiesen_US
dc.subjectDivision of laboren_US
dc.titleWomen's work in the economy of the Cocoa belt: a comparisonen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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