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dc.contributor.authorReed, Marnieen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Dien_US
dc.coverage.spatialIowa State University, Ames, Iowaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-30T13:58:08Z
dc.date.available2020-04-30T13:58:08Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationLiu, D., & Reed, M. (2019). Asymmetrical cognitive load imposed by processing native and non-native speech. In J. Levis, C. Nagle, & E. Todey (Eds.), Proceedings of the 10th Pronunciation in Second Language Learning and Teaching Conference, ISSN 2380-9566, Ames, IA, September 2018 (pp. 179-190). Ames, IA: Iowa State University.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40479
dc.description.abstractIntonation affects information processing and comprehension. Previous research has found that some international teaching assistants (ITAs) fail to exploit English intonation, potentially posing processing difficulties to students who are native English speakers. However, researchers have also found that non-native listeners found it easier to process sentences given by a non-native speaker with a shared language background, leading to an interlanguage speech intelligibility benefit (ISIB). Therefore, how native speaker teaching assistant (NSTA)’s and ITA’s classroom speech affects the processing, comprehension, and attitudes of listeners with different language backgrounds needs to be further investigated. Using a dual-task paradigm, a comprehension questionnaire, and an attitudinal questionnaire, the present study investigates how the pronunciation and intonation of a NSTA and an ITA affect native English speakers’ and Mandarin-speaking English learners’ processing and comprehension of a lecture, and attitudes towards the two instructors. The present study found shared processing advantages when the listeners shared the L1 of the speaker, but overall lecture comprehension and attitude were unaffected. These findings support and extend prior research studies surveying ITAs’ intonational patterns and ISIB. These findings also have implications for research on the teaching of English pronunciation to non-native instructors.en_US
dc.format.extentp. 179 - 190en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.titleAsymmetrical cognitive load Imposed by processing native and non-native speechen_US
dc.typeConference materialsen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, Wheelock College of Education & Human Developmenten_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.mycv525419


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