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dc.contributor.authorHarris, Josephen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-30T18:07:56Z
dc.date.available2020-04-30T18:07:56Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-08
dc.identifier.citationJoseph Harris. "Science and Democracy Reconsidered." Engaging Science, Technology, and Society, Volume 6, pp. 102. https://doi.org/10.17351/ests2020.383
dc.identifier.issn2413-8053
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40487
dc.description.abstractTo what extent is the normative commitment of STS to the democratization of science a product of the democratic contexts where it is most often produced? STS scholars have historically offered a powerful critical lens through which to understand the social construction of science, and seminal contributions in this area have outlined ways in which citizens have improved both the conduct of science and its outcomes. Yet, with few exceptions, it remains that most STS scholarship has eschewed study of more problematic cases of public engagement of science in rich, supposedly mature Western democracies, as well as examination of science-making in poorer, sometimes non-democratic contexts. How might research on problematic cases and dissimilar political contexts traditionally neglected by STS scholars push the field forward in new ways? This paper responds to themes that came out of papers from two Eastern Sociological Society Presidential Panels on Science and Technology Studies in an Era of Anti-Science. It considers implications of the normative commitment by sociologists working in the STS tradition to the democratization of science.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://estsjournal.org/index.php/ests/article/view/383
dc.format.extentp. 102en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSociety for Social Studies of Science (4S)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEngaging Science, Technology, and Society
dc.rights"Copyright (c) 2020 Joseph Harris. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License."en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ Add dc.date.issued: 2020-01-08
dc.subjectPublic engagementen_US
dc.subjectCitizen scienceen_US
dc.subjectDemocracyen_US
dc.subjectScience and technologyen_US
dc.subjectSTSen_US
dc.subjectSociologyen_US
dc.titleScience and democracy reconsidereden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.17351/ests2020.383
pubs.elements-sourcecrossrefen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Sociologyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.date.online2020-01-08
dc.description.oaversionPublished version
dc.identifier.mycv527085


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"Copyright (c) 2020 Joseph Harris. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License."
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as "Copyright (c) 2020 Joseph Harris. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License."