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dc.contributor.authorWright, Rachel M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCorrea, Adrienne M.S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorQuigley, Lucinda A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSantiago-Vázquez, Lory Z.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShamberger, Kathryn E.F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Sarah W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-04T14:55:19Z
dc.date.available2020-05-04T14:55:19Z
dc.identifier.citationRachel M Wright, Adrienne MS Correa, Lucinda A Quigley, Lory Z Santiago-Vázquez, Kathryn EF Shamberger, Sarah W Davies. "Gene Expression of Endangered Coral (Orbicella spp.) in Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary After Hurricane Harvey." Frontiers in Marine Science, Volume 6, https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2019.00672
dc.identifier.issn2296-7745
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40524
dc.description.abstractAbout 190 km south of the Texas–Louisiana border, the East and West Flower Garden Banks (FGB) have maintained > 50% coral cover with infrequent and minor incidents of disease or bleaching since monitoring began in the 1970s. However, a mortality event, affecting 5.6 ha (2.6% of the area) of the East FGB, occurred in late July 2016 and coincided with storm-generated freshwater runoff extending offshore and over the reef system. To capture the immediate effects of storm-driven freshwater runoff on coral and symbiont physiology, we leveraged the heavy rainfall associated with Hurricane Harvey in late August 2017 by sampling FGB corals at two time points: September 2017, when surface water salinity was reduced (∼34 ppt); and 1 month later when salinity had returned to typical levels (∼36 ppt in October 2017). Tissue samples (N = 47) collected midday were immediately preserved for gene expression profiling from two congeneric coral species (Orbicella faveolata and Orbicella franksi) from the East and West FGB to determine the physiological consequences of storm-derived runoff. In the coral, differences between host species and sampling time points accounted for the majority of differentially expressed genes. Gene ontology enrichment for genes differentially expressed immediately after Hurricane Harvey indicated increases in cellular oxidative stress responses. Although tissue loss was not observed on FGB reefs following Hurricane Harvey, our results suggest that poor water quality following this storm caused FGB corals to experience sub-lethal stress. We also found dramatic expression differences across sampling time points in the coral’s algal symbiont, Breviolum minutum. Some of these differentially expressed genes may be involved in the symbionts’ response to changing environments, including a group of differentially expressed post-transcriptional RNA modification genes. In this study, we cannot disentangle the effects of reduced salinity from the collection time point, so these expression patterns could also be related to seasonality. These findings highlight the urgent need for continued monitoring of these reef systems to establish a baseline for gene expression of healthy corals in the FGB system across seasons, as well as the need for integrated solutions to manage stormwater runoff in the Gulf of Mexico.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00672/full
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SAen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Marine Science
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 Wright, Correa, Quigley, Santiago-Vázquez, Shamberger and Davies. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
dc.titleGene expression of endangered coral (Orbicella spp.) in flower garden banks National Marine Sanctuary after Hurricane Harveyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmars.2019.00672
pubs.elements-sourcecrossrefen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Biologyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.date.online2019-11-05
dc.date.online2019-11-05
dc.description.oaversionPublished version
dc.identifier.mycv529768


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Copyright © 2019 Wright, Correa, Quigley, Santiago-Vázquez, Shamberger and Davies. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2019 Wright, Correa, Quigley, Santiago-Vázquez, Shamberger and Davies. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.