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dc.contributor.authorPalfai, Tibor P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Jessica L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSaitz, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.authorKratzer, Maya P. L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOtis, John D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBernstein, Judith A.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_US
dc.date2019-08-23
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-06T17:01:38Z
dc.date.available2020-05-06T17:01:38Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-29
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31464645
dc.identifier.citationTibor P Palfai, Jessica L Taylor, Richard Saitz, Maya PL Kratzer, John D Otis, Judith A Bernstein. 2019. "Development of a tailored, telehealth intervention to address chronic pain and heavy drinking among people with HIV infection: integrating perspectives of patients in HIV care.." Addiction Science & Clinical Practice Volume 14, Issue 1, https://doi.org/10.1186/s13722-019-0165-1
dc.identifier.issn1940-0640
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40624
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Chronic pain and heavy drinking commonly co-occur and can infuence the course of HIV. There have been no interventions designed to address both of these conditions among people living with HIV (PLWH), and none that have used telehealth methods. The purpose of this study was to better understand pain symptoms, patterns of alcohol use, treatment experiences, and technology use among PLWH in order to tailor a telehealth intervention that addresses these conditions SUBJECTS: Ten participants with moderate or greater chronic pain and heavy drinking were recruited from a cohort of patients engaged in HIV-care (Boston Alcohol Research Collaborative on HIV/AIDS Cohort) and from an integrated HIV/primary care clinic at a large urban hospital. METHODS: One-on-one interviews were conducted with participants to understand experiences and treatment of HIV, chronic pain, and alcohol use. Participants’ perceptions of the infuence of alcohol on HIV and chronic pain were explored as was motivation to change drinking. Technology use and treatment preferences were examined in the fnal section of the interview. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and uploaded into NVivo® v12 software for analysis. A codebook was developed based on interviews followed by thematic analysis in which specifc meanings were assigned to codes. RESULTS: A number of themes were identifed that had implications for intervention tailoring including: resilience in coping with HIV; autonomy in health care decision-making; coping with pain, stress, and emotion; understanding treatment rationale; depression and social withdrawal; motives to drink and refrain from drinking; technology use and capacity; and preference for intervention structure and style. Ratings of intervention components indicated that participants viewed each of the proposed intervention content areas as “helpful” to “very helpful”. Videoconferencing was viewed as an acceptable modality for intervention delivery CONCLUSIONS: Results helped specify treatment targets and provided information about how to enhance intervention delivery. The interviews supported the view that videoconferencing is an acceptable telehealth method of addressing chronic pain and heavy drinking among PLWH.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUH2 AA026192 - NIAAA NIH HHSen_US
dc.format.extent14 pagesen_US
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAddiction Science & Clinical Practice
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2019. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectAlcoholen_US
dc.subjectChronic painen_US
dc.subjectHIVen_US
dc.subjectHeavy drinkingen_US
dc.subjectSelf-managementen_US
dc.subjectPublic health and health servicesen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of a tailored, telehealth intervention to address chronic pain and heavy drinking among people with HIV infection: integrating perspectives of patients in HIV care.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13722-019-0165-1
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, School of Public Healthen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-5441-7421 (Otis, John D)
dc.identifier.mycv487674


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© The Author(s) 2019. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2019. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.