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dc.contributor.authorMiller, Daniel P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Margaret M. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWaller, Maureen R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNepomnyaschy, Lennaen_US
dc.contributor.authorEmory, Allison Dwyeren_US
dc.date2019-12-25
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-11T16:03:51Z
dc.date.available2020-05-11T16:03:51Z
dc.date.issued2020-02-22
dc.identifier.citationDaniel Miller, Margaret Thomas, Maureen Waller, Lenna Nepomnyaschy, Allison Emory. 2020. "Father Involvement and Socioeconomic Disparities in Child Academic Outcomes." Journal of Marriage and Family, Volume 82, Issue 2, pp. 515 - 533. https://doi.org/10.1111/jomf.12666
dc.identifier.issn0022-2445
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40744
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE This article explores whether father involvement can reduce socioeconomic disparities in child academic outcomes. BACKGROUND An emerging body of literature points to the benefits to children of involvement by low‐socioeconomic status (SES) fathers. Research has not systematically investigated whether differences in father involvement can account for SES‐based disparities in child outcomes. METHOD This study used data from 12,030 unique children from the 1998 Early Childhood Longitudinal Study. Using multiple regression models and novel simulation analyses, it investigated whether accounting for SES‐based differences in either the amount or effect of involvement by biological fathers explains gaps in reading scores, math scores, and rates of grade retention between low‐SES and high‐SES children. RESULTS Father residence, resident father school involvement, and a comprehensive index of nonresident father involvement were associated with better child academic outcomes. Associations between residence and nonresident father involvement and child outcomes were consistent for fathers in all SES quintiles. School involvement by low‐SES resident fathers was more beneficial than involvement by the highest SES fathers. Simulation analyses indicated that increasing the amount of involvement by low‐SES fathers to that of high‐SES fathers would result in minimal decreases in SES disparities in reading and math scores, but more sizeable decreases in rates of grade retention. CONCLUSION Increasing some types of father involvement may help to narrow academic gaps between low‐ and high‐SES children.en_US
dc.format.extentp. 515 - 533en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Marriage and Family
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectDemographyen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectReligion and religious studiesen_US
dc.subjectFamily studiesen_US
dc.subjectChild well-beingen_US
dc.subjectDisparitiesen_US
dc.subjectFathersen_US
dc.subjectInequalitiesen_US
dc.subjectParent involvementen_US
dc.subjectSocial classen_US
dc.titleFather involvement and socioeconomic disparities in child academic outcomesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jomf.12666
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: 6 monthsen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, School of Social Worken_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-1455-2805 (Miller, Daniel)
dc.identifier.mycv532114


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International