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dc.contributor.authorCalabro, F. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVaina, Lucia M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-12T13:35:45Z
dc.date.available2020-05-12T13:35:45Z
dc.date.issued2012-08-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000307251300007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationF.J. Calabro, L.M. Vaina. 2012. "Interaction of cortical networks mediating object motion detection by moving observers." EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH, Volume 221, Issue 2, pp. 177 - 189 (13). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-012-3159-8
dc.identifier.issn0014-4819
dc.identifier.issn1432-1106
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40782
dc.descriptionPublished in final edited form as: Exp Brain Res. 2012 August ; 221(2): 177–189. doi:10.1007/s00221-012-3159-8.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe task of parceling perceived visual motion into self- and object motion components is critical to safe and accurate visually guided navigation. In this paper, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine the cortical areas functionally active in this task and the pattern connectivity among them to investigate the cortical regions of interest and networks that allow subjects to detect object motion separately from induced self-motion. Subjects were presented with nine textured objects during simulated forward self-motion and were asked to identify the target object, which had an additional, independent motion component toward or away from the observer. Cortical activation was distributed among occipital, intra-parietal and fronto-parietal areas. We performed a network analysis of connectivity data derived from partial correlation and multivariate Granger causality analyses among functionally active areas. This revealed four coarsely separated network clusters: bilateral V1 and V2; visually responsive occipito-temporal areas, including bilateral LO, V3A, KO (V3B) and hMT; bilateral VIP, DIPSM and right precuneus; and a cluster of higher, primarily left hemispheric regions, including the central sulcus, post-, pre- and sub-central sulci, pre-central gyrus, and FEF. We suggest that the visually responsive networks are involved in forming the representation of the visual stimulus, while the higher, left hemisphere cluster is involved in mediating the interpretation of the stimulus for action. Our main focus was on the relationships of activations during our task among the visually responsive areas. To determine the properties of the mechanism corresponding to the visual processing networks, we compared subjects’ psychophysical performance to a model of object motion detection based solely on relative motion among objects and found that it was inconsistent with observer performance. Our results support the use of scene context (e.g., eccentricity, depth) in the detection of object motion. We suggest that the cortical activation and visually responsive networks provide a potential substrate for this computation.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by NIH grant RO1NS064100 to L.M.V. We thank Victor Solo for discussions regarding models of functional connectivity and our subjects for participating in the psychophysical and fMRI experiments. This research was carried out in part at the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at the Massachusetts General Hospital, using resources provided by the Center for Functional Neuroimaging Technologies, P41RR14075, a P41 Regional Resource supported by the Biomedical Technology Program of the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), National Institutes of Health. This work also involved the use of instrumentation supported by the NCRR Shared Instrumentation Grant Program and/or High-End Instrumentation Grant Program; specifically, grant number S10RR021110. (RO1NS064100 - NIH; National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), National Institutes of Health; S10RR021110 - NCRR)en_US
dc.format.extentp. 177 - 189en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSPRINGERen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences & neurologyen_US
dc.subjectObject motionen_US
dc.subjectSelf-motionen_US
dc.subjectfMRIen_US
dc.subjectConnectivityen_US
dc.subjectHuman visual-cortexen_US
dc.subjectVentral intraparietal areaen_US
dc.subjectLateral occipital complexen_US
dc.subjectSuperior temporal areaen_US
dc.subjectSurface-based analysisen_US
dc.subjectOptic flow stimulien_US
dc.subjectHuman brainen_US
dc.subjectResponse selectivityen_US
dc.subjectPerceptual decisionen_US
dc.subjectFunctional analysisen_US
dc.subjectAdulten_US
dc.subjectBrain mappingen_US
dc.subjectCerebral cortexen_US
dc.subjectFeedback, physiologicalen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectFunctional lateralityen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectImage processing, computer-assisteden_US
dc.subjectMagnetic resonance imagingen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMotion perceptionen_US
dc.subjectMovementen_US
dc.subjectNerve neten_US
dc.subjectOxygenen_US
dc.subjectPhotic stimulationen_US
dc.subjectPsychomotor performanceen_US
dc.subjectPsychophysicsen_US
dc.subjectSignal detection, psychologicalen_US
dc.subjectYoung adulten_US
dc.subjectMedical and health sciencesen_US
dc.subjectPsychology and cognitive sciencesen_US
dc.subjectNeurology & neurosurgeryen_US
dc.titleInteraction of cortical networks mediating object motion detection by moving observersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00221-012-3159-8
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineeringen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineeringen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-5636-8352 (Vaina, LM)
dc.identifier.mycv36870


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