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dc.contributor.authorCalabro, Finnegan J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRana, Kunjan D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVaina, Lucia M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-12T15:18:51Z
dc.date.available2020-05-12T15:18:51Z
dc.date.issued2011-01-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000289076200005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationFinnegan J Calabro, Kunjan D Rana, Lucia M Vaina. 2011. "Two mechanisms for optic flow and scale change processing of looming." JOURNAL OF VISION, Volume 11, Issue 3, 9 pp. https://doi.org/10.1167/11.3.5
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40799
dc.descriptionPublished in final edited form as: J Vis. ; 11(3): . doi:10.1167/11.3.5.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe detection of looming, the motion of objects in depth, underlies many behavioral tasks, including the perception of self-motion and time-to-collision. A number of studies have demonstrated that one of the most important cues for looming detection is optic flow, the pattern of motion across the retina. Schrater et al. have suggested that changes in spatial frequency over time, or scale changes, may also support looming detection in the absence of optic flow (P. R. Schrater, D. C. Knill, & E. P. Simoncelli, 2001). Here we used an adaptation paradigm to determine whether the perception of looming from optic flow and scale changes is mediated by single or separate mechanisms. We show first that when the adaptation and test stimuli were the same (both optic flow or both scale change), observer performance was significantly impaired compared to a dynamic (non-motion, non-scale change) null adaptation control. Second, we found no evidence of cross-cue adaptation, either from optic flow to scale change, or vice versa. Taken together, our data suggest that optic flow and scale changes are processed by separate mechanisms, providing multiple pathways for the detection of looming.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Jonathan Victor and the anonymous reviewers of the paper for feedback and suggestions regarding the stimuli used here. This work was supported by NIH grant R01NS064100 to LMV. (R01NS064100 - NIH)en_US
dc.format.extent9 pagesen_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJOURNAL OF VISION
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectOphthalmologyen_US
dc.subjectMotion-3Den_US
dc.subjectVisual cortexen_US
dc.subjectHuman visual systemen_US
dc.subject2nd-order motionen_US
dc.subjectArea MTen_US
dc.subjectFrequency-selectivityen_US
dc.subjectTemporal frequencyen_US
dc.subject1st-order motionen_US
dc.subjectBrain damageen_US
dc.subjectHuman visionen_US
dc.subjectFirst orderen_US
dc.subjectAdaptation, physiologicalen_US
dc.subjectCuesen_US
dc.subjectDepth perceptionen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectOptic flowen_US
dc.subjectSize perceptionen_US
dc.subjectSpace perceptionen_US
dc.subjectVisual pathwaysen_US
dc.subjectMedical and health sciencesen_US
dc.subjectPsychology and cognitive sciencesen_US
dc.subjectExperimental psychologyen_US
dc.titleTwo mechanisms for optic flow and scale change processing of loomingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/11.3.5
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineeringen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineeringen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-5636-8352 (Vaina, Lucia M)
dc.identifier.mycv68305


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