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dc.contributor.authorLobel, Phillipen_US
dc.contributor.authorLobel, Lisaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRandall, Johnen_US
dc.date2020-02-17
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-13T17:53:03Z
dc.date.available2020-05-13T17:53:03Z
dc.date.issued2020-02-20
dc.identifier.citationPhillip Lobel, Lisa Lobel, John Randall. 2020. "Johnston Atoll: Reef Fish Hybrid Zone between Hawaii and the Equatorial Pacific." Diversity, Volume 12, Issue 83, pp. 1 - 15 (15). https://doi.org/10.3390/d12020083
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40832
dc.description.abstractJohnston Atoll is isolated in the Central Pacific Ocean (16°45′ N 169°31′ W) about 1287 km (800 miles) southwest of Honolulu, Hawaii and 1440 km (900 miles) north of the equatorial Line Islands, Kiribati. The labrid species, Thalassoma lutescens, has a wide range of distribution in the equatorial Pacific. The related species, Thalassoma duperrey, is endemic to the Hawaiian Islands. The pelagic larvae of both species dispersed to Johnston Atoll, where we found a mix of adult phenotypes representing a range of hybridization events over generations. A hybrid acanthurid was also documented. In addition, the arrival and colonization of two pomacentrid (damselfish) species to the atoll was observed in 1999. These pomacentrid sister-species, Abudefduf abdominalis and A. vaigiensis, have become established populations with subsequent hybridization. The biogeography of the Johnston Atoll coral reef fish population shows some degree of local population retention. It is also evident that this biogeographic isolation is periodically compromised by large ocean current oscillations in the equatorial and central Pacific Ocean that bring larval fishes from either Hawaii or the Line Islands, and may distribute Johnston Atoll originating larvae elsewhere as well. The reef fauna and oceanography of this atoll provides the circumstances for improving scientific insight into marine fish speciation and island biogeography.en_US
dc.format.extentp. 1 - 15en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMDPIen_US
dc.relation.ispartofDiversity
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectBiological invasionen_US
dc.subjectThalassomaen_US
dc.subjectAbudefdufen_US
dc.subjectLabridaeen_US
dc.subjectPomacentridaeen_US
dc.subjectPacific biogeographyen_US
dc.subjectCoral reefen_US
dc.subjectInvasive speciesen_US
dc.subjectFish colonizationen_US
dc.subjectSpecies definitionen_US
dc.subjectAnalytical chemistryen_US
dc.subjectElectrical and electronic engineeringen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental science and managementen_US
dc.subjectEcologyen_US
dc.titleJohnston Atoll: reef fish hybrid zone between Hawaii and the equatorial Pacificen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/d12020083
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Biologyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.date.online2020-02-20
dc.identifier.mycv540874


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International