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dc.contributor.authorRuck, Carlen_US
dc.date2019-01-01
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-14T14:48:03Z
dc.date.available2020-05-14T14:48:03Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-01
dc.identifier.citationCarl Ruck. 2019. "The Beast Initiate: The Lycanthropy of Heracles." Athens Journal of History, Volume 5, Issue 4, pp. 225 - 246 (21). https://doi.org/10.30958/ajhis.5-4-1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40841
dc.description.abstractThe obscurantist Hellenistic poet Lycophron referenced the initiation of Heracles as a beast suckling the breast of the goddess Hera. This was the event that was the mythological origin of the Galaxy and of the lily flower that incarnated the same deifying essence as the celestial milk of the goddess and it was the etiology for the domestication of felines. As the Lion of Nemea, Heracles was the greatest of the wild cats. The lily was an analogue of a sacred mushroom, as the narkissos of Persephone’s abduction by Hades. The event of the lactation of Heracles is depicted on four Etruscan mirrors and a Faliscan-Hellenic red-figure krater. The deifying milk-flower of the goddess was a ritual of adoption into the family of the celestial deities, that Hera performed also with two other bastard sons of Zeus, Hermes and Dionysus. As the beast being initiated, Heracles became a wolf. Like the motif of the domestication of the cat, the lycanthropy of Heracles involves the whole family of canines, from the domesticated dog to its wilder antecedents in the wolf and its analogue as the fox. The lycanthropy initiation is a bacchanalian rite of root- cutters and is a motif of warrior brotherhood widespread among the Indo-European peoples.en_US
dc.format.extentp. 225 - 246en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherATNERen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAthens Journal of History
dc.rights"Athens Journal of History is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License."en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.titleThe beast initiate: the lycanthropy of Heraclesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.30958/ajhis.5-4-1
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Classical Studiesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.date.online2019-01-01
dc.identifier.mycv542153


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"Athens Journal of History is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License."
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