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dc.contributor.authorSunil, Smrithien_US
dc.contributor.authorErdener, Sefik Evrenen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Blaire Ssen_US
dc.contributor.authorPostnov, Dmitryen_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, Jianboen_US
dc.contributor.authorKura, Sreekanthen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Xiaojunen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Ichun Andersonen_US
dc.contributor.authorBoas, David A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKılıç, Kıvılcımen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.date2020-01-02
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-14T18:07:18Z
dc.date.available2020-05-14T18:07:18Z
dc.date.issued2020-01
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32042854
dc.identifier.citationSmrithi Sunil, Sefik Evren Erdener, Blaire S Lee, Dmitry Postnov, Jianbo Tang, Sreekanth Kura, Xiaojun Cheng, Ichun Anderson Chen, David A Boas, Kıvılcım Kılıç. 2020. "Awake chronic mouse model of targeted pial vessel occlusion via photothrombosis." Neurophotonics, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp. 015005-1 - 015005-18. https://doi.org/10.1117/1.NPh.7.1.015005
dc.identifier.issn2329-423X
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40867
dc.description.abstractAnimal models of stroke are used extensively to study the mechanisms involved in the acute and chronic phases of recovery following stroke. A translatable animal model that closely mimics the mechanisms of a human stroke is essential in understanding recovery processes as well as developing therapies that improve functional outcomes. We describe a photothrombosis stroke model that is capable of targeting a single distal pial branch of the middle cerebral artery with minimal damage to the surrounding parenchyma in awake head-fixed mice. Mice are implanted with chronic cranial windows above one hemisphere of the brain that allow optical access to study recovery mechanisms for over a month following occlusion. Additionally, we study the effect of laser spot size used for occlusion and demonstrate that a spot size with small axial and lateral resolution has the advantage of minimizing unwanted photodamage while still monitoring macroscopic changes to cerebral blood flow during photothrombosis. We show that temporally guiding illumination using real-time feedback of blood flow dynamics also minimized unwanted photodamage to the vascular network. Finally, through quantifiable behavior deficits and chronic imaging we show that this model can be used to study recovery mechanisms or the effects of therapeutics longitudinally.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipR01 EB021018 - NIBIB NIH HHS; R01 MH111359 - NIMH NIH HHS; R01 NS108472 - NINDS NIH HHSen_US
dc.format.extentp. 015005-1 - 015005-18en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSPIEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNeurophotonics
dc.rights© The Authors. Published by SPIE under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. Distribution or reproduction of this work in whole or in part requires full attribution of the original publication, including its DOI.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectAwakeen_US
dc.subjectChronicen_US
dc.subjectImagingen_US
dc.subjectPhotothrombosisen_US
dc.subjectStrokeen_US
dc.titleAwake chronic mouse model of targeted pial vessel occlusion via photothrombosisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1117/1.NPh.7.1.015005
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineeringen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineeringen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-6709-7711 (Boas, David A)
dc.identifier.mycv539556


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© The Authors. Published by SPIE under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. Distribution or reproduction of this work in whole or in part requires full attribution of the original publication, including its DOI.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Authors. Published by SPIE under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. Distribution or reproduction of this work in whole or in part requires full attribution of the original publication, including its DOI.