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dc.contributor.advisorPerrachione, Tyler K.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorLim, Sung-Jooen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaupe, Mayaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-17T20:08:32Z
dc.date.available2020-05-17T20:08:32Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40951
dc.description.abstractPerceptual adaptation to a talker allows listeners to efficiently resolve inherent ambiguities present in the speech signal introduced by the lack of a one-to-one mapping between acoustic signals and intended phonemic categories across talkers. In ideal listening environments, preceding speech context has been found to enhance perceptual adaptation to a talker. However, little is known regarding how perceptual adaptation to speech occurs in more realistic listening environments with background noise. The current investigation explored how talker variability and preceding speech context affect identification of phonetically-confusable words in adverse listening conditions. Our results showed that listeners were less accurate and slower in identifying mixed-talker speech compared to single-talker speech when target words were presented in multi-talker babble, and that preceding speech context enhanced word identification performance under noise both in single- and mixed talker conditions. These results extend previous findings of perceptual adaptation to talker-specific speech in quiet environments, suggesting that the same underlying mechanisms may serve to perceptually adapt to speech both in quiet and in noise. Both cognitive and attentional mechanisms were proposed to jointly underlie perceptual adaptation to speech, including an active control process that preallocates cognitive resources to processing talker variability and auditory streaming processes that support successful feedforward allocation of attention to salient talker-specific features.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectSpeech therapyen_US
dc.titlePerceptual adaptation to speech in calibrated noiseen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2020-05-17T01:03:18Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineSargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-2426-599X


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International