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dc.contributor.authorMeier, Erin L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Jeffrey P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPan, Yueen_US
dc.contributor.authorKiran, Swathien_US
dc.coverage.spatialNetherlandsen_US
dc.date2019-06-30
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-18T13:56:08Z
dc.date.available2020-05-18T13:56:08Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31491828
dc.identifier.citationErin L Meier, Jeffrey P Johnson, Yue Pan, Swathi Kiran. 2019. "A lesion and connectivity-based hierarchical model of chronic aphasia recovery dissociates patients and healthy controls.." Neuroimage Clin, Volume 23, pp. 101919. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2019.101919
dc.identifier.issn2213-1582
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40958
dc.description.abstractTraditional models of left hemisphere stroke recovery propose that reactivation of remaining ipsilesional tissue is optimal for language processing whereas reliance on contralesional right hemisphere homologues is less beneficial or possibly maladaptive in the chronic recovery stage. However, neuroimaging evidence for this proposal is mixed. This study aimed to elucidate patterns of effective connectivity in patients with chronic aphasia in light of healthy control connectivity patterns and in relation to damaged tissue within left hemisphere regions of interest and according to performance on a semantic decision task. Using fMRI and dynamic causal modeling, biologically-plausible models within four model families were created to correspond to potential neural recovery patterns, including Family A: Left-lateralized connectivity (i.e., no/minimal damage), Family B: Bilateral anterior-weighted connectivity (i.e., posterior damage), Family C: Bilateral posterior-weighted connectivity (i.e., anterior damage) and Family D: Right-lateralized connectivity (i.e., extensive damage). Controls exhibited a strong preference for left-lateralized network models (Family A) whereas patients demonstrated a split preference for Families A and C. At the level of connections, controls exhibited stronger left intrahemispheric task-modulated connections than did patients. Within the patient group, damage to left superior frontal structures resulted in greater right intrahemispheric connectivity whereas damage to left ventral structures resulted in heightened modulation of left frontal regions. Lesion metrics best predicted accuracy on the fMRI task and aphasia severity whereas left intrahemispheric connectivity predicted fMRI task reaction times. These results are discussed within the context of the hierarchical recovery model of chronic aphasia.en_US
dc.format.extentp. 101919en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroimage Clin
dc.rights© 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY-NC-ND/4.0/
dc.subjectAphasiaen_US
dc.subjectEffective connectivityen_US
dc.subjectLexical-semanticsen_US
dc.subjectStrokeen_US
dc.subjectStructure-function relationshipsen_US
dc.titleA lesion and connectivity-based hierarchical model of chronic aphasia recovery dissociates patients and healthy controlsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.nicl.2019.101919
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent Collegeen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Speech, Language & Hearing Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-1200-5936 (Kiran, Swathi)
dc.identifier.mycv487861


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© 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license.