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dc.contributor.authorDes Roches, Carrie A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMitko, Annetteen_US
dc.contributor.authorKiran, Swathien_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-18T14:35:42Z
dc.date.available2020-05-18T14:35:42Z
dc.date.issued2017-02-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000393069300001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationCarrie A Des Roches, Annette Mitko, Swathi Kiran. 2017. "Relationship between Self-Administered Cues and Rehabilitation Outcomes in Individuals with Aphasia: Understanding Individual Responsiveness to a Technology-Based Rehabilitation Program." FRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE, Volume 11, 15 pp. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2017.00007
dc.identifier.issn1662-5161
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40960
dc.description.abstractAn advantage of rehabilitation administered on computers or tablets is that the tasks can be self-administered and the cueing required to complete the tasks can be monitored. Though there are many types of cueing, few studies have examined how participants’ response to rehabilitation is influenced by self-administered cueing, which is cueing that is always available but the individual decides when and which cue to administer. In this study, participants received a tablet-based rehabilitation where the tasks were selfpaced and remotely monitored by a clinician. The results of the effectiveness of this study were published previously (Des Roches et al., 2015). The current study looks at the effect of cues on accuracy and rehabilitation outcomes. Fifty-one individuals with aphasia completed a 10-week program using Constant Therapy on an iPad targeted at improving language and cognitive deficits. Three questions were examined. The first examined the effect of cues on accuracy collapsed across time. Results showed a trend where the greater the cue use, the lower the accuracy, although some participants showed the opposite effect. This analysis divided participants into profiles based on cue use and accuracy. The second question examined how each profile differed in percent cue use and on standardized measures at baseline. Results showed that the four profiles were significantly different in frequency of cues and scores on WAB-R, CLQT, BNT, and ASHA-FACS, indicating that participants with lower scores on the standardized tests used a higher percentage of cues, which were not beneficial, while participants with higher scores on the standardized tests used a lower frequency of cues, which were beneficial. The third question examined how the relationship between cues and accuracy was affected by the course of treatment. Results showed that both more and less severe participants showed a decrease in cue use and an increase in accuracy over time, though more severe participants continued to used a greater number of cues. It is possible that self-administered cues help some individuals to access information that is otherwise inaccessible, even if there is not an immediate effect. Ultimately, the results demonstrate the need for individually modifying the levels of assistance during rehabilitation.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis project was funded by the Coulter Foundation for Translational Research. (Coulter Foundation for Translational Research)en_US
dc.format.extent15 pagesen_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherFRONTIERS MEDIA SAen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE
dc.rights"Copyright © 2017 Des Roches, Mitko and Kiran. This is an open-access articledistributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided theoriginal author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms."en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY/4.0/
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences & neurologyen_US
dc.subjectAphasiaen_US
dc.subjectiPad-based rehabilitationen_US
dc.subjectConstant therapyen_US
dc.subjectTreatmenten_US
dc.subjectSelf-administered cuesen_US
dc.subjectIndividualized rehabilitationen_US
dc.subjectWord retrievalen_US
dc.subjectTherapyen_US
dc.subjectRecoveryen_US
dc.subjectStrokeen_US
dc.subjectLanguageen_US
dc.subjectIrehaben_US
dc.subjectExperimental psychologyen_US
dc.subjectCognitive sciencesen_US
dc.titleRelationship between self-administered cues and rehabilitation outcomes in individuals with aphasia: understanding individual responsiveness to a technology-based rehabilitation programen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnhum.2017.00007
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent Collegeen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Speech, Language & Hearing Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-1200-5936 (Kiran, Swathi)
dc.identifier.mycv192950


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"Copyright © 2017 Des Roches, Mitko and Kiran. This is an open-access articledistributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided theoriginal author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms."
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as "Copyright © 2017 Des Roches, Mitko and Kiran. This is an open-access articledistributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided theoriginal author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms."