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dc.contributor.authorMartin, Janeen_US
dc.coverage.spatialWest Africaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-18T20:04:17Z
dc.date.available2020-05-18T20:04:17Z
dc.date.issued1982
dc.identifier.issn0281—6814
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40974
dc.descriptionAfrican Studies Center Working Paper No. 64en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper discusses migrant laborers from eastern Liberia called Krumen who worked along Africa's west coast in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the system of which they were a part. The study focuses on areas where Britishers were working. British traders and British officials who established themselves in areas of present-day Nigeria, Ghana and Sierra Leone in the nineteenth century depended on Africans for the day-to-day operation of their activities. When they did not find willing helpers close at hand, they recruited Africans from other West African countries. Skilled artisans and clerks came from Sierra Leone and Ghana. Unskilled laborers - who worked on one- or, at most, two-year contracts - were brought from eastern Liberia. Men from along Liberia's eastern seaboard had worked for Europeans on shipboard since the eighteenth century; in the early nineteenth century they began to work on shore.[TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston University, African Studies Centeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking Papers in African Studies; no. 64
dc.rightsCopyright © 1982, by the author.en_US
dc.subjectLiberiaen_US
dc.subjectMigrant laboren_US
dc.subjectColonialismen_US
dc.subjectKrumenen_US
dc.subjectMigrant workersen_US
dc.subjectWest Africaen_US
dc.titleKrumen "Down The Coast": Liberian migrants On the West African coast in the 19th centuryen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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