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dc.contributor.advisorWong, Joyce Y.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYu, Jinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-20T13:30:52Z
dc.date.available2020-05-20T13:30:52Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/41041
dc.description.abstractSPIONs have unique material properties: ultra-small size and high magnetic susceptibility. These properties give SPIONs advantages to be used in a wide range of applications such as NMR/MRI contrast agents, cancer hyperthermia therapy, and cell- targeted and magnetically-triggered intracellular uptake. However, research has found that it is challenging to develop a SPION system that has controllable colloidal stability. This thesis endeavored to develop a SPION surface coating that allowed creation of a SPION system with known surface properties, hence enabling the study of its colloidal stability with a combination of computational and experimental methods. With the knowledge of colloidal behavior of nanoparticles, this thesis further explored the magnetic properties of SPIONs by designing lipid nanoparticles encapsulating (LNPs) that target and isolate a rare type of immune cell.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectMaterials scienceen_US
dc.subjectCell separationen_US
dc.subjectColloiden_US
dc.subjectLipiden_US
dc.titleDeveloping superparamagnetic nanoparticle (SPION) systems with tunable colloidal stability and magnetic propertiesen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2020-05-19T04:03:53Z
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMaterials Science & Engineeringen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-3659-829X


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