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dc.contributor.authorSpaulding, Jayen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpaulding, J.L.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialSudanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-21T19:41:11Z
dc.date.available2020-05-21T19:41:11Z
dc.date.issued1989
dc.identifier.issn0281—6814
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/41088
dc.descriptionAfrican Studies Center Working Paper No. 134en_US
dc.description.abstractThe pig is not a popular animal in the Sudan today, and the idea of eating one is a notion equally repugnant to most people of the north and the south. The historical record seems to indicate, however, that this has not always been the case in times past; indeed, swine are still kept by a limited number of small communities who live across a belt extending from the Nuba Mountains eastward to the Ethiopian border. The demise of a once significant domesticated animal is a theme worthy of careful historical analysis, for food - the production, distribution, storage and preparation of food - occupies a very important position in any cultural system, and a major change in the definition of what is, or is not, food, constitutes a benchmark in the periodization of social history. This study explores one such cultural watershed, in addressing the questions of when and why the mainstream of the northern Sudanese cultural community rejected the pig.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston University, African Studies Centeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking Papers in African Studies; no. 134
dc.rightsCopyright © 1989, by the author.en_US
dc.subjectSudanen_US
dc.subjectPigsen_US
dc.subjectDomesticated animalsen_US
dc.subjectLivestock farmingen_US
dc.subjectPorken_US
dc.titlePigs: the democratic philosophers of the medieval Sudanen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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