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dc.contributor.advisorMcKnight, C. Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWada, Masayukien_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Kevin Huien_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-15T17:48:50Z
dc.date.available2020-06-15T17:48:50Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/41191
dc.description.abstractChimeric antigen receptors (CAR) are modular genetically modified receptors that consist of an extracellular antigen binding domain fused to intracellular T-cell signaling domains. CAR therapy broadly consists of engineering a patient’s own T-cells to express a CAR directed against a tumor cell surface antigen. This therapy has been extremely successful in treating B-cell neoplasms by targeting CD19 and is paradigm changing in developing personalized immunotherapy for oncology applications. Although impressive response rates are observed, the durability of therapeutic response remains a concern and relapse mechanisms frequently center around issues of antigen loss. In addition, heterogeneous disease and solid tumors present formidable barriers toward extending the applicability of CAR technology as a result of compounding issues of tumor microenvironment and cell trafficking. In this thesis we review the current thought on the state of CAR therapy and the challenges to therapeutic efficacy, therapeutic manufacture, and clinical safety in the context of each other with an overall emphasis on identifying the fundamental goal of making fit-for-purpose CARs for different diseases.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectTherapyen_US
dc.subjectCanceren_US
dc.subjectCARen_US
dc.subjectImmunotherapyen_US
dc.subjectPersonalized medicineen_US
dc.subjectT-cellsen_US
dc.titleLooking forward for chimeric antigen receptor therapyen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2020-06-14T01:00:48Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedical Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-4761-5083


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International