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dc.contributor.advisorSpencer, Jeanen_US
dc.contributor.authorChime, Chinecheremen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-16T13:40:17Z
dc.date.available2020-06-16T13:40:17Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/41199
dc.description.abstractColorectal cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the United States with men and women facing a lifetime risk of between 5 and 6 percent. Colorectal cancers develop from polyps which can be conventional adenomas or serrated polyps. Serrated polyps account for close to 25% of sporadic colorectal cancer. This study evaluated the available literature that considered lifestyle factors which have an established association with colorectal cancer. Tobacco smoking and a high consumption of alcohol were consistently associated with more adverse outcomes. A body mass index above 30 was also associated with less positive outcomes for patients. On the other hand, fish oil and a high level of pre-diagnosis physical activity were associated with improved outcomes among colorectal cancer patients. A diet of increased folate intake also resulted in reduced risk of colorectal cancer and was considered a protective factor. The results of this review can inform directions for future research on lifestyle factors associated with colorectal cancer and their use to improve the outcomes of colorectal cancer patientsen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.titleLifestyle factors affecting the occurrence, presentation, and mortality of colorectal canceren_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2020-06-15T22:11:44Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedical Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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