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dc.contributor.advisorBielmeier, Christie M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLuan, Victoria Pu-Liangen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-15T15:40:06Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/41463
dc.description.abstractVector-borne disease infection rates are increasing due to larger populations of mosquitos surviving in warmer climates caused by climate change. This is a particular threat for U.S. soldiers deployed overseas in semitropical/tropical regions because it can result in lost manpower days, decreased unit morale, and increased medical costs. Current insect-resistant garments are embedded with short-lived insecticides or have stiff weave patterns to deter biting, which can make these garments chemically harmful or physically uncomfortable to the wearer. Currently, there exists standardized test methods for mechanical puncture by large-diameter penetrators such as knives and needles, but there are no standardized tests for micro-penetrators (i.e. mosquito proboscis). This study developed an enhanced micro-penetrator puncture test (micro-PPT), which is a quasi-static puncture technique that quickly measures the puncture resistance of fabrics to micro-penetrators similar to mosquitos. This research investigated the enhanced micro-PPT by (a) validating an improved design of the simulated proboscis, (b) improving the puncture test method, (c) examining the effect of the simulated proboscis effective length on the critical buckling load, and (d) conducting a sample size sensitivity analysis. The enhanced micro-PPT was to be conducted on five fabrics and the results were to be compared with an enhanced live-mosquito blood-feed (LMBF) test recently developed at the University of Notre Dame (UND) for the same five fabrics. However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, these results could not be obtained. Results of this research suggests that the development of a new simulated proboscis design improved control of the penetrator geometry during puncture compared to the previous micro-PPT design. Measurements of the fabricated simulated proboscis showed that the critical buckling load, Pcr, varied only by 2.1% and the penetrator-to-fabric angle during insertion, θpsf was 90°± 0.14°. Furthermore, fabrication of the enhanced simulated proboscis fabrication method was 60% faster than previous methods. This study proposes an effective test method that has potential to rapidly test for insect bite resistance of fabrics used in high-volume production of PPE, utility uniforms, and activewear.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectTextile researchen_US
dc.subjectFabricen_US
dc.subjectInsecten_US
dc.subjectProboscisen_US
dc.subjectPunctureen_US
dc.subjectResistanceen_US
dc.subjectTextileen_US
dc.titleInvestigation of textile resistance to puncture by micro-penetrators with geometry of mosquito proboscisen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2020-09-28T01:01:52Z
dc.description.embargo2021-09-27T00:00:00Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMaterials Science & Engineeringen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-9678-086X


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