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dc.contributor.authorAl-Amoudi, Rana Abdullah Salehen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-05T16:04:09Z
dc.date.available2020-11-05T16:04:09Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.identifier.other(OCoLC)927167225
dc.identifier.other(OCoLC)ocn927167225
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/41590
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: This work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community: please click Download and log in with a valid BU account to access. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertation (DScD) --Boston University, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, 2014 (Department of Restorative Sciences and Biomaterials).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliography: leaves 70-76.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjectives: This study evaluated the effect of carbonated, non-carbonated beverages and tap water on the erosive potential of dental enamel and to measure the efficacy of fluoride containing dental materials on the challenged enamel surface. Material and Methods: Beverages used in this study included: Coke, Diet Coke, Gatorade, Red Bull, Tropicana, tap water, tea, coffee, and S.pelligrino sparkling water. One hundred and forty-four intact permanent premolars and molars, extracted for orthodontic or periodontal reasons free of hypocalcification, caries and craze or fracture. Enamel surfaces were cleaned and polished using a non-fluoridated paste and a slow speed-brushing cup. All specimens were mounted using epoxy resin and then polished using different grit sizes to reach a smooth highly polished enamel surface. Four specimens were randomly assigned to each beverage and for each group (GIC, RMGIC, FFS, OH). Knoop microhardness testing with a load of 1OOgm for 1O sec was used for each specimen after application of beverages at each stage. Each stage was categorized as follows based on the specimen immersion solution: baseline, saliva, 1st beverages, dental material coating, and 2nd beverages. At each stage microhardness of the specimens was measured after 20 min from initial immersion; except after coating the enamel surface with the various fluoride releasing dental materials. This was done 24 hours after placement of the material. All specimens were immersed at 37[degrees]C on a shaker. The microhardness data was evaluated using oneway ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer test at significance level of p[less than]0.05. Results: Results showed that Coke, Diet Coke, Gatorade, and Red Bull with or without fluoride treatment revealed the lowest post treatment enamel surface microhardness measurements. However, tea, coffee, S.pelligrino, Tropicana, and tap water microhardness values did not significantly change from the baseline data. Fluoride treatments with different types of dental materials (GIC, RMGIC, FFS, OH) had a significant impact along with the beverage type on microhardness.  Conclusion: Both carbonated and non-carbonated beverages displayed a significant erosive effect on dental enamel; moreover, fluoridated fissure sealants and oral hygiene measures demonstrated a significant protective influence on enamel surfaces.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.subjectDental enamelen_US
dc.subjectBeveragesen_US
dc.subjectFluorides, topicalen_US
dc.titleEffect of beverages and fluoride releasing dental materials on microhardness of enamel surfacesen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Science in Dentistryen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineRestorative Sciences and Biomaterialsen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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