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dc.contributor.authorMarquez, M Gabrielaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-05T16:29:33Z
dc.date.available2020-11-05T16:29:33Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.date.submitted2005
dc.identifier.other(OCoLC)77708315
dc.identifier.otherb27070591
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/41613
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: This work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community: please click Download and log in with a valid BU account to access. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (MSD)--Boston University, Goldman School of Dental Medicine, 2005 (Orthodontics).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliography: leaves 112-119.en_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Survivin is an antiapoptotic gene expressed in all phases of the nomal cell cycle but highest during the G2/M interphase. Survivin implication in cell proliferation has been the target of extensive cancer research. Objective: To investigate the in vitro effects of vitamin D3 On the expression of Survivin in normal human osteoblast cell cultures as well as in commercially obtained MG-63 osteosarcoma cells. Methods: Human alveolar bone explants were recovered from extraction sites of non-Carious molars and premolars of 8 healthy donors and laboratory cultivated to 2nd passage. MG-63 Osteosarcoma cells were purchased from ATCC. To assess the effect of vitamin D3, bone markers were confirmed using a I125-labeled Human Osteocalcin Kit (Nichols Diagnostics) and an Alkaline Phosphatase Assay (Sigma) Survivin levels were measured using an enzyme immunometric assay (Total Survivin TiterZyme[R], Assay Designs) after 7 and 20 days of culture in both experimental and control groups. Results: Higher levels of Survivin were detected in non vitamin D3 treated osteoblasts vs. osteosarcoma cells at 7 days (P[less than] 0.01). Survivin expression in osteoblasts decreased after vitamin D3 treatment at 7 (P[less than]0.05) and 20 days of culture (P=NS) (Fig. 1). There was no effect of vitamin D3 on Survivin expression in MG-63 cells at 7 or 20 days (P=NS) (Fig.2). The response to vitamin D3 in the osteoblast group was statistically significant at 7 and 20 days of culture when compared to the osteosarcoma group (P[less than]0.01). Conclusions: Expression of Survivin in cultured human osteoblast and MG-63 osteosarcoma cells was positively identified. Our findings suggest a positive correlation between higher expression of Survivin and less differentiated osteoblasts that still retain their proliferative ability. Strategic gene therapy to promote up-regulation of Survivin could potentially increase or maintain a higher proliferative stage in pre-osteoblastic cells prior to further differentiation.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.subjectCholecalciferolen_US
dc.subjectSurvivin protein, humanen_US
dc.titleEffects of vitamin D3 on Survivin expression in human osteoblastsen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Science in Dentistryen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineOrthodonticsen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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