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dc.contributor.authorRogers, N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHermiz, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGanji, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKaestner, E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKilic, K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHossain, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorThunemann, Martinen_US
dc.contributor.authorCleary, D. R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCarter, B. S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBarba, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDevor, Annaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHalgren, E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDayeh, S. A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGilja, V.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-18T14:35:59Z
dc.date.available2020-12-18T14:35:59Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30742605
dc.identifier.citationN. Rogers, J. Hermiz, M. Ganji, E. Kaestner, K. Kilic, L. Hossain, M. Thunemann, D.R. Cleary, B.S. Carter, D. Barba, A. Devor, E. Halgren, S.A. Dayeh, V. Gilja. 2019. "Correlation Structure in Micro-ECoG Recordings is Described by Spatially Coherent Components." PLoS Comput Biol, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp. e1006769 - ?. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1006769
dc.identifier.issn1553-7358
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/41823
dc.description.abstractElectrocorticography (ECoG) is becoming more prevalent due to improvements in fabrication and recording technology as well as its ease of implantation compared to intracortical electrophysiology, larger cortical coverage, and potential advantages for use in long term chronic implantation. Given the flexibility in the design of ECoG grids, which is only increasing, it remains an open question what geometry of the electrodes is optimal for an application. Conductive polymer, PEDOT:PSS, coated microelectrodes have an advantage that they can be made very small without losing low impedance. This makes them suitable for evaluating the required granularity of ECoG recording in humans and experimental animals. We used two-dimensional (2D) micro-ECoG grids to record intra-operatively in humans and during acute implantations in mouse with separation distance between neighboring electrodes (i.e., pitch) of 0.4 mm and 0.2/0.25 mm respectively. To assess the spatial properties of the signals, we used the average correlation between electrodes as a function of the pitch. In agreement with prior studies, we find a strong frequency dependence in the spatial scale of correlation. By applying independent component analysis (ICA), we find that the spatial pattern of correlation is largely due to contributions from multiple spatially extended, time-locked sources present at any given time. Our analysis indicates the presence of spatially structured activity down to the sub-millimeter spatial scale in ECoG despite the effects of volume conduction, justifying the use of dense micro-ECoG grids.en_US
dc.format.extentp. e1006769en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Comput Biol
dc.rightsCopyright: © 2019 Rogers et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectAnimalsen_US
dc.subjectBrain-computer interfacesen_US
dc.subjectCerebral cortexen_US
dc.subjectElectric conductivityen_US
dc.subjectElectrocorticographyen_US
dc.subjectElectrodes, implanteden_US
dc.subjectElectroencephalographyen_US
dc.subjectElectrophysiological phenomenaen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectMiceen_US
dc.subjectMicroelectrodesen_US
dc.subjectPolymersen_US
dc.subjectRecordsen_US
dc.subjectMathematical sciencesen_US
dc.subjectBiological sciencesen_US
dc.subjectInformation and computing sciencesen_US
dc.subjectBioinformaticsen_US
dc.titleCorrelation structure in micro-ECoG recordings is described by spatially coherent componentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pcbi.1006769
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesRogers, Nicholas Hermiz, John Ganji, Mehran Kaestner, Erik Kilic, Kivilcim Hossain, Lorraine Thunemann, Martin Cleary, Daniel R Carter, Bob S Barba, David Devor, Anna Halgren, Eric Dayeh, Shadi A Gilja, Vikash eng R01 MH111359/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ R01 NS057198/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S. PLoS Comput Biol. 2019 Feb 11;15(2):e1006769. doi: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1006769. eCollection 2019 Feb. Electrocorticography (ECoG) is becoming more prevalent due to improvements in fabrication and recording technology as well as its ease of implantation compared to intracortical electrophysiology, larger cortical coverage, and potential advantages for use in long term chronic implantation. Given the flexibility in the design of ECoG grids, which is only increasing, it remains an open question what geometry of the electrodes is optimal for an application. Conductive polymer, PEDOT:PSS, coated microelectrodes have an advantage that they can be made very small without losing low impedance. This makes them suitable for evaluating the required granularity of ECoG recording in humans and experimental animals. We used two-dimensional (2D) micro-ECoG grids to record intra-operatively in humans and during acute implantations in mouse with separation distance between neighboring electrodes (i.e., pitch) of 0.4 mm and 0.2/0.25 mm respectively. To assess the spatial properties of the signals, we used the average correlation between electrodes as a function of the pitch. In agreement with prior studies, we find a strong frequency dependence in the spatial scale of correlation. By applying independent component analysis (ICA), we find that the spatial pattern of correlation is largely due to contributions from multiple spatially extended, time-locked sources present at any given time. Our analysis indicates the presence of spatially structured activity down to the sub-millimeter spatial scale in ECoG despite the effects of volume conduction, justifying the use of dense micro-ECoG grids.en_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineeringen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-4139-079X (Thunemann, M)
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-5143-3960 (Devor, A)
dc.identifier.mycv530076


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Copyright: © 2019 Rogers et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright: © 2019 Rogers et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.