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dc.contributor.authorScelza, Brooke A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPrall, Sean P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBlumenfield, Tamien_US
dc.contributor.authorCrittenden, Alyssa N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGurven, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorKline, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoster, Jeremyen_US
dc.contributor.authorKushnick, Geoffen_US
dc.contributor.authorMattison, Siobhán M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPillsworth, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorShenk, Mary K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStarkweather, Kathrineen_US
dc.contributor.authorStieglitz, Jonathanen_US
dc.contributor.authorSum, Chun-Yien_US
dc.contributor.authorYamaguchi, Kyokoen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcElreath, Richarden_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-23T18:39:43Z
dc.date.available2020-12-23T18:39:43Z
dc.date.issued2020-01
dc.identifier.citationBrooke A Scelza, Sean P Prall, Tami Blumenfield, Alyssa N Crittenden, Michael Gurven, Michelle Kline, Jeremy Koster, Geoff Kushnick, Siobhán M Mattison, Elizabeth Pillsworth, Mary K Shenk, Kathrine Starkweather, Jonathan Stieglitz, Chun-Yi Sum, Kyoko Yamaguchi, Richard McElreath. 2020. "Patterns of paternal investment predict cross-cultural variation in jealous response." Nature Human Behaviour, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp. 20 - 26. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-019-0654-y
dc.identifier.issn2397-3374
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/41844
dc.description.abstractLong-lasting, romantic partnerships are a universal feature of human societies, but almost as ubiquitous is the risk of instability when one partner strays. Jealous response to the threat of infidelity is well studied, but most empirical work on the topic has focused on a proposed sex difference in the type of jealousy (sexual or emotional) that men and women find most upsetting, rather than on how jealous response varies^1,2. This stems in part from the predominance of studies using student samples from industrialized populations, which represent a relatively homogenous group in terms of age, life history stage and social norms^3,4. To better understand variation in jealous response, we conducted a 2-part study in 11 populations (1,048 individuals). In line with previous work, we find a robust sex difference in the classic forced-choice jealousy task. However, we also show substantial variation in jealous response across populations. Using parental investment theory, we derived several predictions about what might trigger such variation. We find that greater paternal investment and lower frequency of extramarital sex are associated with more severe jealous response. Thus, partner jealousy appears to be a facultative response, reflective of the variable risks and costs of men’s investment across societies.en_US
dc.format.extentp. 20 - 26en_US
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNature Human Behaviour
dc.subjectBiological anthropologyen_US
dc.subjectHuman behaviouren_US
dc.titlePatterns of paternal investment predict cross-cultural variation in jealous responseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41562-019-0654-y
pubs.elements-sourcecrossrefen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of General Studiesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.date.online2019-07-22
dc.identifier.mycv567624


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