Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPérez-Morelo, Diegoen_US
dc.contributor.authorStange, Alexanderen_US
dc.contributor.authorLally, Richard W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Lawrence K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorImboden, Matthiasen_US
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, David K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAksyuk, Vladimir A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBishop, David J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-26T19:58:36Z
dc.date.available2021-01-26T19:58:36Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifierhttp://arxiv.org/abs/2004.13771v1
dc.identifier.citationDiego Pérez-Morelo, Alexander Stange, Richard W Lally, Lawrence K Barrett, Matthias Imboden, David K Campbell, Vladimir A Aksyuk, David J Bishop. "Searching for the Casimir Energy." https://arxiv.org/abs/2004.13771
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/41918
dc.description.abstractIn this article, we present a nano-electromechanical system (NEMS) designed to detect changes in the Casimir Energy. The Casimir effect is a result of the appearance of quantum fluctuations in the electromagnetic vacuum. Previous experiments have used nano- or micro- scale parallel plate capacitors to detect the Casimir force by measuring the small attractive force these fluctuations exert between the two surfaces. In this new set of experiments, we aim to directly detect shifts in the Casimir energy in the vacuum due to the presence of metallic parallel plates, one of which is a superconductor. A change in the Casimir energy of this configuration is predicted to shift the superconducting transition temperature (T_c) because of an interaction between it and the superconducting condensation energy. The experiment we discuss consists of taking a superconducting film, carefully measuring its transition temperature, bringing a conducting plate close to the film, creating a Casimir cavity, and then measuring the transition temperature again. The expected shifts will be small, comparable to the normal shifts one sees in cycling superconducting films to cryogenic temperatures and so using a NEMS resonator and doing this in situ is the only practical way to obtain accurate, reproducible data. Using a thin Pb film and opposing Au surface, we observe no shift in T_c greater than 12 𝜇K down to a minimum spacing of approximately 70 nm.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectApplied physicsen_US
dc.subjectMesoscale and nanoscale physicsen_US
dc.titleSearching for the Casimir Energyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionFirst author draften_US
pubs.elements-sourcearxiven_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Physicsen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-4502-5629 (Campbell, David K)
dc.identifier.mycv555238


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record