Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMoore, Mary Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Craig Scotten_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-28T13:33:57Z
dc.date.available2021-04-28T13:33:57Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/42425
dc.description.abstractThe California-Nevada Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church exhibits a faster rate of decline than the already declining Protestant church in the United States. American consumerism and the professionalization of the church reveal a broken ecclesiology and missiology. Yet immigrant congregations display a set of apostolic practices that often correspond with growth and multiplication and an effective Wesleyan missional ecclesiology. Using Positive Deviance Theory, this thesis builds a robust 18-month process of generous impartation and contextual adoption between Fijian congregations, representing one particular immigrant group, and another partner congregation. The congregations will share their unique apostolic practices in intentional gatherings over time, shaped by intercultural theology and a vibrant Wesleyan missiology and enacted in incarnational relationships. The projected result is contextualized apostolic practices in both congregations that contribute to their growth and vitality.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectTheologyen_US
dc.subjectApostolicen_US
dc.subjectContextualizationen_US
dc.subjectGrowthen_US
dc.subjectInterculturalen_US
dc.subjectMissionalen_US
dc.subjectRelationalen_US
dc.titleMultiplying the church through the interculturation of apostolic practices: a case study of the California-Nevada Annnual Conference of the United Methodist Churchen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2021-04-27T16:03:23Z
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Ministryen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineTheologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0001-7135-4779


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record