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dc.contributor.authorRueger, Theresaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBuston, Peter M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBogdanowicz, Steven M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, Marian Y.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_US
dc.date2021-01-11
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-01T18:21:45Z
dc.date.available2021-07-01T18:21:45Z
dc.date.issued2021-03
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/33459427
dc.identifier.citationTheresa Rueger, Peter M Buston, Steven M Bogdanowicz, Marian Y Wong. 2021. "Genetic relatedness in social groups of the emerald coral goby Paragobiodon xanthosoma creates potential for weak kin selection.." Mol Ecol, Volume 30, Issue 5, pp. 1311 - 1321. https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.15809
dc.identifier.issn1365-294X
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/42724
dc.description.abstractAnimals forming social groups that include breeders and nonbreeders present evolutionary paradoxes; why do breeders tolerate nonbreeders? And why do nonbreeders tolerate their situation? Both paradoxes are often explained with kin selection. Kin selection is, however, assumed to play little or no role in social group formation of marine organisms with dispersive larval phases. Yet, in some marine organisms, recent evidence suggests small-scale patterns of relatedness, meaning that this assumption must always be tested. Here, we investigated the genetic relatedness of social groups of the emerald coral goby, Paragobiodon xanthosoma. We genotyped 73 individuals from 16 groups in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea, at 20 microsatellite loci and estimated pairwise relatedness among all individuals. We found that estimated pairwise relatedness among individuals within groups was significantly higher than the pairwise relatedness among individuals from the same reef, and pairwise relatedness among individuals from the same reef was significantly higher than the pairwise relatedness among individuals from different reefs. This spatial signature suggests that there may be very limited dispersal in this species. The slightly positive relatedness within groups creates the potential for weak kin selection, which may help to resolve the paradox of why breeders tolerate subordinates in P. xanthosoma. The other paradox, why nonbreeders tolerate their situation, is better explained by alternative hypotheses such as territory inheritance, and ecological and social constraints. We show that even in marine animals with dispersive larval phases, kin selection needs to be considered to explain the evolution of complex social groups.en_US
dc.format.extentp. 1311 - 1321en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofMol Ecol
dc.rightsThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2021 The Authors. Molecular Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectCoral gobyen_US
dc.subjectGenetic relatednessen_US
dc.subjectInclusive fitnessen_US
dc.subjectLimited dispersalen_US
dc.subjectSocial evolutionen_US
dc.subjectBiological sciencesen_US
dc.subjectEvolutionary biologyen_US
dc.titleGenetic relatedness in social groups of the emerald coral goby Paragobiodon xanthosoma creates potential for weak kin selectionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/mec.15809
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Biologyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.mycv589801


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This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium,
provided the original work is properly cited.
© 2021 The Authors. Molecular Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2021 The Authors. Molecular Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.