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dc.contributor.authorCao, Jianshuen_US
dc.contributor.authorCogdell, Richard J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCoker, David F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDuan, Hong-Guangen_US
dc.contributor.authorHauer, Jürgenen_US
dc.contributor.authorKleinekathöfer, Ulrichen_US
dc.contributor.authorJansen, Thomas L.C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMančal, Tomášen_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, R.J. Dwayneen_US
dc.contributor.authorOgilvie, Jennifer P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorProkhorenko, Valentyn I.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRenger, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorTan, Howe-Siangen_US
dc.contributor.authorTempelaar, Roelen_US
dc.contributor.authorThorwart, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorThyrhaug, Erlingen_US
dc.contributor.authorWestenhoff, Sebastianen_US
dc.contributor.authorZigmantas, Donatasen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.date2020-01-06
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-08T18:33:17Z
dc.date.available2021-07-08T18:33:17Z
dc.date.issued2020-04
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32284982
dc.identifier.citationJianshu Cao, Richard J Cogdell, David F Coker, Hong-Guang Duan, Jürgen Hauer, Ulrich Kleinekathöfer, Thomas LC Jansen, Tomáš Mančal, RJ Dwayne Miller, Jennifer P Ogilvie, Valentyn I Prokhorenko, Thomas Renger, Howe-Siang Tan, Roel Tempelaar, Michael Thorwart, Erling Thyrhaug, Sebastian Westenhoff, Donatas Zigmantas. 2020. "Quantum biology revisited.." Sci Adv, Volume 6, Issue 14, pp. eaaz4888 - ?. https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aaz4888
dc.identifier.issn2375-2548
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/42744
dc.description.abstractPhotosynthesis is a highly optimized process from which valuable lessons can be learned about the operating principles in nature. Its primary steps involve energy transport operating near theoretical quantum limits in efficiency. Recently, extensive research was motivated by the hypothesis that nature used quantum coherences to direct energy transfer. This body of work, a cornerstone for the field of quantum biology, rests on the interpretation of small-amplitude oscillations in two-dimensional electronic spectra of photosynthetic complexes. This Review discusses recent work reexamining these claims and demonstrates that interexciton coherences are too short lived to have any functional significance in photosynthetic energy transfer. Instead, the observed long-lived coherences originate from impulsively excited vibrations, generally observed in femtosecond spectroscopy. These efforts, collectively, lead to a more detailed understanding of the quantum aspects of dissipation. Nature, rather than trying to avoid dissipation, exploits it via engineering of exciton-bath interaction to create efficient energy flow.en_US
dc.format.extenteaaz4888en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSci Adv
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License 4.0 (CC BY-NC).en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectAlgorithmsen_US
dc.subjectEnergy transferen_US
dc.subjectLight-harvesting protein complexesen_US
dc.subjectModels, theoreticalen_US
dc.subjectPhotosynthesisen_US
dc.subjectQuantum theoryen_US
dc.subjectSpectrum analysisen_US
dc.titleQuantum biology revisiteden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/sciadv.aaz4888
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Chemistryen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.identifier.mycv554096


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Copyright © 2020 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License 4.0 (CC BY-NC).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2020 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License 4.0 (CC BY-NC).