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dc.contributor.authorJasinska, Anna J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDong, Tien S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLagishetty, Venuen_US
dc.contributor.authorKatzka, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.authorJacobs, Jonathan P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchmitt, Christopher A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCramer, Jennifer Danzyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMa, Dongzhuen_US
dc.contributor.authorCoetzer, Willem G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrobler, J. Paulen_US
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Trudy R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFreimer, Nelsonen_US
dc.contributor.authorPandrea, Ivonaen_US
dc.contributor.authorApetrei, Cristianen_US
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_US
dc.date2020-10-06
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-21T18:55:24Z
dc.date.available2021-09-21T18:55:24Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-06
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/33158452
dc.identifier.citationAnna J Jasinska, Tien S Dong, Venu Lagishetty, William Katzka, Jonathan P Jacobs, Christopher A Schmitt, Jennifer Danzy Cramer, Dongzhu Ma, Willem G Coetzer, J Paul Grobler, Trudy R Turner, Nelson Freimer, Ivona Pandrea, Cristian Apetrei. 2020. "Shifts in microbial diversity, composition, and functionality in the gut and genital microbiome during a natural SIV infection in vervet monkeys.." Microbiome, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp. 154 - ?. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40168-020-00928-4
dc.identifier.issn2049-2618
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/43044
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The microbiota plays an important role in HIV pathogenesis in humans. Microbiota can impact health through several pathways such as increasing inflammation in the gut, metabolites of bacterial origin, and microbial translocation from the gut to the periphery which contributes to systemic chronic inflammation and immune activation and the development of AIDS. Unlike HIV-infected humans, SIV-infected vervet monkeys do not experience gut dysfunction, microbial translocation, and chronic immune activation and do not progress to immunodeficiency. Here, we provide the first reported characterization of the microbial ecosystems of the gut and genital tract in a natural nonprogressing host of SIV, wild vervet monkeys from South Africa. RESULTS: We characterized fecal, rectal, vaginal, and penile microbiomes in vervets from populations heavily infected with SIV from diverse locations across South Africa. Geographic site, age, and sex affected the vervet microbiome across different body sites. Fecal and vaginal microbiome showed marked stratification with three enterotypes in fecal samples and two vagitypes, which were predicted functionally distinct within each body site. External bioclimatic factors, biome type, and environmental temperature influenced microbiomes locally associated with vaginal and rectal mucosa. Several fecal microbial taxa were linked to plasma levels of immune molecules, for example, MIG was positively correlated with Lactobacillus and Escherichia/Shigella and Helicobacter, and IL-10 was negatively associated with Erysipelotrichaceae, Anaerostipes, Prevotella, and Anaerovibrio, and positively correlated with Bacteroidetes and Succinivibrio. During the chronic phase of infection, we observed a significant increase in gut microbial diversity, alterations in community composition (including a decrease in Proteobacteria/Succinivibrio in the gut) and functionality (including a decrease in genes involved in bacterial invasion of epithelial cells in the gut), and partial reversibility of acute infection-related shifts in microbial abundance observed in the fecal microbiome. As part of our study, we also developed an accurate predictor of SIV infection using fecal samples. CONCLUSIONS: The vervets infected with SIV and humans infected with HIV differ in microbial responses to infection. These responses to SIV infection may aid in preventing microbial translocation and subsequent disease progression in vervets, and may represent host microbiome adaptations to the virus. Video Abstract.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipR01 RR016300 - NCRR NIH HHS; R01 DK113919 - NIDDK NIH HHS; R01 AI119346 - NIAID NIH HHS; R01 DK119936 - NIDDK NIH HHS; R01 OD010980 - NIH HHS; IK2 CX001717 - CSRD VA; R01 HL123096 - NHLBI NIH HHS; R01 HL117715 - NHLBI NIH HHSen_US
dc.format.extentp.154en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofMicrobiome
dc.rights© The Author(s). 2020. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectAcute infectionen_US
dc.subjectMicrobiomeen_US
dc.subjectPrimateen_US
dc.subjectProteobacteriaen_US
dc.subjectSIVen_US
dc.subjectSuccinivibrioen_US
dc.subjectAnimalsen_US
dc.subjectBacteriaen_US
dc.subjectChlorocebus aethiopsen_US
dc.subjectFecesen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectGastrointestinal microbiomeen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMicrobiotaen_US
dc.subjectMonkey diseasesen_US
dc.subjectRectumen_US
dc.subjectSimian acquired immunodeficiency syndromeen_US
dc.subjectSimian immunodeficiency virusen_US
dc.subjectVaginaen_US
dc.subjectRectumen_US
dc.subjectEcologyen_US
dc.subjectMicrobiologyen_US
dc.subjectMedical microbiologyen_US
dc.titleShifts in microbial diversity, composition, and functionality in the gut and genital microbiome during a natural SIV infection in vervet monkeysen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s40168-020-00928-4
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Anthropologyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-2143-9226 (Schmitt, Christopher A)
dc.identifier.mycv575256


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© The Author(s). 2020. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s). 2020. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.