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dc.contributor.authorOʼShea, Timothy M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWollenberg, A.L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, J.H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAo, Y.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDeming, T.J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSofroniew, M.V.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_US
dc.date2020-10-22
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-25T18:27:41Z
dc.date.available2021-10-25T18:27:41Z
dc.date.issued2020-12-04
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/33277474
dc.identifier.citationT.M. OʼShea, A.L. Wollenberg, J.H. Kim, Y. Ao, T.J. Deming, M.V. Sofroniew. 2020. "Foreign body responses in mouse central nervous system mimic natural wound responses and alter biomaterial functions.." Nat Commun, Volume 11, Issue 1, pp. 6203 - ?. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-19906-3
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/43214
dc.description.abstractBiomaterials hold promise for therapeutic applications in the central nervous system (CNS). Little is known about molecular factors that determine CNS foreign body responses (FBRs) in vivo, or about how such responses influence biomaterial function. Here, we probed these factors in mice using a platform of injectable hydrogels readily modified to present interfaces with different physiochemical properties to host cells. We found that biomaterial FBRs mimic specialized multicellular CNS wound responses not present in peripheral tissues, which serve to isolate damaged neural tissue and restore barrier functions. We show that the nature and intensity of CNS FBRs are determined by definable properties that significantly influence hydrogel functions, including resorption and molecular delivery when injected into healthy brain or stroke injuries. Cationic interfaces elicit stromal cell infiltration, peripherally derived inflammation, neural damage and amyloid production. Nonionic and anionic formulations show minimal levels of these responses, which contributes to superior bioactive molecular delivery. Our results identify specific molecular mechanisms that drive FBRs in the CNS and have important implications for developing effective biomaterials for CNS applications.en_US
dc.format.extentp. 6203en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNat Commun
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2020. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleForeign body responses in mouse central nervous system mimic natural wound responses and alter biomaterial functionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41467-020-19906-3
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineeringen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineeringen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.date.online2020-12-04
dc.identifier.mycv616679


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© The Author(s) 2020. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2020. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.