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dc.contributor.authorPeyton, Tayloren_US
dc.contributor.authorZigarmi, Dreaen_US
dc.date2021-02-01
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-24T18:45:40Z
dc.date.available2021-11-24T18:45:40Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-31
dc.identifier.citationT. Peyton, D. Zigarmi. 2021. "Employee perceptions of their work environment, work passion, and work intentions: A replication study using three samples.." Business Research Quarterly, https://doi.org/10.1177/23409444211002210
dc.identifier.issn2340-9436
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/43406
dc.description.abstractThis study contributes to the emerging literature on the employee work passion appraisal (EWPA) model, by replicating structural equation modeling across three samples (total n= 4613). We examine passion for work as a mediator of employees’ work environment characteristics and work intentions. Our data fit the structure of the EWPA model in three samples. As expected, work environment characteristics were strongly and positively correlated with harmonious passion, but contrary to our expectations, work environment characteristics were moderately and positively correlated with obsessive passion. Harmonious passion was positively correlated with work intentions, but the connection between obsessive passion and work intentions yielded mixed results. The overall results support harmonious passion, and less so obsessive passion, as partial mediators of employees’ perceptions of their work environment characteristics and favorable work intentions. This study has limitations in that it uses a cross-sectional, single-source, self-report design. Practical implications of the study are also presented.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofBusiness Research Quarterly
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2021. Creative Commons Non Commercial CC BY-NC: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access page (https://uk.sagepub.com/aboutus/openaccess.htm).en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.titleEmployee perceptions of their work environment, work passion, and work intentions: A replication study using three samples.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/23409444211002210
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Communicationen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Communication, COM ADMINISTRATIONen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Fine Artsen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Fine Arts, College of Fine Artsen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent Collegeen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Administrationen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, School of Hospitality Administrationen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.date.online2021-03-31
dc.identifier.mycv619645


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© The Author(s) 2021. Creative Commons Non Commercial CC BY-NC: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access page (https://uk.sagepub.com/aboutus/openaccess.htm).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2021. Creative Commons Non Commercial CC BY-NC: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access page (https://uk.sagepub.com/aboutus/openaccess.htm).