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dc.contributor.authorMiller, Hillary E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCordella, Claireen_US
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Jessica A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEzzo, Raniaen_US
dc.contributor.authorQuimby, Meganen_US
dc.contributor.authorHochberg, Daisyen_US
dc.contributor.authorTourville, Jason A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDickerson, Bradford C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGuenther, Frank H.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_US
dc.date2020-12-28
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-24T18:54:15Z
dc.date.available2021-11-24T18:54:15Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/33748756
dc.identifier.citationH.E. Miller, C. Cordella, J.A. Collins, R. Ezzo, M. Quimby, D. Hochberg, J.A. Tourville, B.C. Dickerson, F.H. Guenther. 2021. "Neural substrates of verbal repetition deficits in primary progressive aphasia.." Brain Commun, Volume 3, Issue 1, fcab015. https://doi.org/10.1093/braincomms/fcab015
dc.identifier.issn2632-1297
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/43407
dc.description.abstractIn this cross-sectional study, we examined the relationship between cortical thickness and performance on several verbal repetition tasks in a cohort of patients with primary progressive aphasia in order to test predictions generated by theoretical accounts of phonological working memory that predict phonological content buffers in left posterior inferior frontal sulcus and supramarginal gyrus. Cortical surfaces were reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging scans from 42 participants diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia. Cortical thickness was measured in a set of anatomical regions spanning the entire cerebral cortex. Correlation analyses were performed between cortical thickness and average score across three phonological working memory-related tasks: the Repetition sub-test from the Western Aphasia Battery, a forward digit span task, and a backward digit span task. Significant correlations were found between average working memory score across tasks and cortical thickness in left supramarginal gyrus and left posterior inferior frontal sulcus, in support of prior theoretical accounts of phonological working memory. Exploratory whole-brain correlation analyses performed for each of the three behavioural tasks individually revealed a distinct set of positively correlated regions for each task. Comparison of cortical thickness measures from different primary progressive aphasia sub-types to cortical thickness in age-matched controls further revealed unique patterns of atrophy in the different subtypes.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipR01 DC007683 - NIDCD NIH HHSen_US
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBrain Commun
dc.rightsCopyright The Author(s) (2021). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectMagnetic resonance imagingen_US
dc.subjectAphasiaen_US
dc.subjectCortical thicknessen_US
dc.subjectGODIVA modelen_US
dc.subjectPrimary progressive aphasiaen_US
dc.subjectCorrelation studiesen_US
dc.titleNeural substrates of verbal repetition deficits in primary progressive aphasia.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/braincomms/fcab015
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent Collegeen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Speech, Language & Hearing Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.date.online2021-02-16
dc.identifier.mycv619816


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Copyright The Author(s) (2021). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright The Author(s) (2021). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.