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dc.contributor.authorDecarolis, Francescoen_US
dc.contributor.authorFisman, Raymonden_US
dc.contributor.authorPinotti, Paoloen_US
dc.contributor.authorVannutelli, Silviaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yongxiangen_US
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-14T15:03:16Z
dc.date.available2022-01-14T15:03:16Z
dc.date.issued2022-01-03
dc.date.issued2022-01-03
dc.identifier.citationFrancesco Decarolis, Raymond Fisman, Paolo Pinotti, Silvia Vannutelli, Yongxiang Wang. "Gender and Bureaucratic Corruption: Evidence from Two Countries." The Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, https://doi.org/10.1093/jleo/ewab041
dc.identifier.issn8756-6222
dc.identifier.issn1465-7341
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/43605
dc.description.abstractWe examine the correlation between gender and bureaucratic corruption using two distinct datasets, from Italy and from China. In each case, we find that women are far less likely to be investigated for corruption than men. In our Italian data, female procurement officials are 22% less likely than men to be investigated for corruption by enforcement authorities; in China, female prefectural leaders are 81% less likely to be arrested for corruption than men. While these represent correlations (rather than definitive causal effects), both are very robust relationships, which survive the inclusion of fine-grained individual and geographic controls, and based on Oster’s (2019. “Unobservable Selection and Coefficient Stability: Theory and Evidence,” 37 Journal of Business & Economic Statistics 187–204.) test unlikely to be driven by unobservables. Using data from a survey of Italian procurement officials, we present tentative evidence on mechanism: the gender gap is partly due to women acting more “defensively” in administering their duties.en_US
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofThe Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization
dc.subjectEconomicsen_US
dc.subjectApplied economicsen_US
dc.subjectLawen_US
dc.titleGender and bureaucratic corruption: evidence from two countriesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/jleo/ewab041
pubs.elements-sourcecrossrefen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Economicsen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.date.online2022-01-03
dc.identifier.mycv697553


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