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dc.contributor.authorFerruzzi, Jacopoen_US
dc.contributor.authorSun, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGkousioudi, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPilvar, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRoblyer, Darrenen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yanhangen_US
dc.contributor.authorZaman, Muhammad H.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_US
dc.date2019-09-08
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-14T18:12:21Z
dc.date.available2022-01-14T18:12:21Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-20
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31748563
dc.identifier.citationJ. Ferruzzi, M. Sun, A. Gkousioudi, A. Pilvar, D. Roblyer, Y. Zhang, M.H. Zaman. 2019. "Compressive Remodeling Alters Fluid Transport Properties of Collagen Networks - Implications for Tumor Growth.." Sci Rep, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp. 17151 - ?. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-50268-z
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/43610
dc.description.abstractBiomechanical alterations to the tumor microenvironment include accumulation of solid stresses, extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffening and increased fluid pressure in both interstitial and peri-tumoral spaces. The relationship between interstitial fluid pressurization and ECM remodeling in vascularized tumors is well characterized, while earlier biomechanical changes occurring during avascular tumor growth within the peri-tumoral ECM remain poorly understood. Type I collagen, the primary fibrous ECM constituent, bears load in tension while it buckles under compression. We hypothesized that tumor-generated compressive forces cause collagen remodeling via densification which in turn creates a barrier to convective fluid transport and may play a role in tumor progression and malignancy. To better understand this process, we characterized the structure-function relationship of collagen networks under compression both experimentally and computationally. Here we show that growth of epithelial cancers induces compressive remodeling of the ECM, documented in the literature as a TACS-2 phenotype, which represents a localized densification and tangential alignment of peri-tumoral collagen. Such compressive remodeling is caused by the unique features of collagen network mechanics, such as fiber buckling and cross-link rupture, and reduces the overall hydraulic permeability of the matrix.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipR01 HL098028 - NHLBI NIH HHS; U01 CA202123 - NCI NIH HHSen_US
dc.format.extentp. 17151en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSci Rep
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2019. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleCompressive remodeling alters fluid transport properties of collagen networks - implications for tumor growthen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-019-50268-z
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineeringen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineeringen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.identifier.mycv494064


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© The Author(s) 2019. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2019. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.