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dc.contributor.authorHoffman-Timerman, Loisen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-09T18:10:12Z
dc.date.available2013-04-09T18:10:12Z
dc.date.issued1924
dc.date.submitted1924
dc.identifier.otherb14746694
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/5204
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractWe have endeavored to show that man innately uses music in worship. The primitive African, Figian and American Indian uses each his type of this art to worship. We have looked into China, and Japan to find that in ancestor worship, Bonfucianism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Shintoism the worshiper sings. We can not picture the sentimental Hindoo speaking all of his prayers, nor the Arab not singing to Mohammed. Classic Greece knew and used the vocal art with her plastic. We have recalled the Old Testament's constant mention of music, have thought of those songs the Christ used to sing, have traced the use of song through the heresies and movements of the mediaeval church, and come to its modern use in Europe and America, including also the Orient where missions takes the art as one of her greatest aids. A list of sacred solos, duets, anthems and responses, Oratorios and Cantatas completes any possible contribution which has been made. These numbers are almost all favorites of those who sing at worship. They have, in part, been sung by the writer, who wishes to testify to their enormous worship value.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.titleVocal music a means of religious propagandaen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineTheologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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