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dc.contributor.authorWang, Ching-Taoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-09T18:32:33Z
dc.date.available2013-04-09T18:32:33Z
dc.date.issued1950
dc.date.submitted1950
dc.identifier.otherb14734928
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/5393
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractIn conclusion, we may find that the world trade is fundamentally out of balance. Other countries simply are not earning enough dollars to pay for what they import from us. They have a "dollar shortage". It was mainly because of: loss of the Western European's overseas investment; reduced imports by the United States; and lastly, the rise in prices of importing primary commodity prices. The critical lack of balance in world trade should be corrected primarily by stimulating an expansion or exports of goods and services from other countries to the United States, accompanied by an expansion, as far as feasible, or United States foreign invesment. The task is to be achieved by mutual cooperation of both business and government on both sides of the Atlantic.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictionsen_US
dc.titleThe Marshall plan and its achievementsen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineEconomicsen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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