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dc.contributor.authorRiddle, Caraen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-30T14:26:21Z
dc.date.available2013-04-30T14:26:21Z
dc.date.issued2013-04-30
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/5435
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores the decision to close the school located at the Dayton Art Institute (DAI). While the School of the Dayton Art Institute (SDAI) was successful, and produced thriving artists and industrial designers for the region, within 15 miles of the DAI there was a new public university offering art degrees, a private university offering art degrees, and a community college offering classes in art. The SDAI decided to compile reports and examine their school through self-studies and made the decision to close its school in 1975. After careful consideration of these reports, interviews of previous faculty and students of the SDAI, and interviews of the current faculty of local universities, the decision to close the SDAI was found to be a wise choice. While the idea of attending an art museum-school is a desirable one, the degrees offered by area universities are more affordable and the separation of art museum and school was beneficial to this institute because it helped the DAI to focus its efforts on children’s programming to elevate it to national acclaim (Gorman, 2009).en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectMuseumen_US
dc.subjectSchoolen_US
dc.subjectArt degreeen_US
dc.subjectMuseum-schoolen_US
dc.subjectDayton art instituteen_US
dc.titleThe Art Museum's Function In Educationen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US


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