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dc.contributor.authorSweet, Benjamin Hershen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-28T01:33:24Z
dc.date.available2013-06-28T01:33:24Z
dc.date.issued1949
dc.date.submitted1949
dc.identifier.otherb14762675
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/5984
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston University PLEASE NOTE: page 49 appears to be missing from the thesis. Our determination is that this is the result of misnumbering by the author, and no substantive content is actually missing. If you are able to determine otherwise, please contact us.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present thesis is an attempt by the author to fully describe the effects of radioactive emanations upon bacteria. The work consists of two sections. The first, a historical review of the literature which summarizes the effect of emanations from various sources upon different bacteria. This includes the effects upon the viable count, morphological and cultural characteristics, biochemical reactions and changes in virulence. An attempt is also made to explain the action of such radiations by means of the "Target Theory", other theories of possible modes of action are also discussed. The conclusions reached,in the first section are that radiations have a definite lethal effect upon bacteria, depending upon the type of radiation employed and the time and distance of exposure. Second, that it is possible to obtain mutant forms which are different from the parent forms in both cultural and morphological characteristics. Third, that it is possible to obtain changes in biochemical and of a immunological nature, but these are not permanent. The second section is an effort by the author to confirm the work of earlier experimenters who have "tagged" E.coli with radioactive Iodine by means of a alkaline Iodination. This section describes the method of iodination as well as a description of the biochemical and cultural characteristics of such irradiated bacteria. The results indicated that from 9-12 per cent of the bacteria are "tagged" by this procedure; that the viable count is decreased by more 50 per cent due to the method of iodination rather than the effect of the radioactive isotope. Thirdly, that no differences in cultural or morphological characteristics were noted.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictionsen_US
dc.titlePart I: The effects of radio-active emanations upon bacteria; Part II: The tagging of E. Coli with radio-active iodineen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineBacteriologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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