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dc.contributor.authorPetherick, Florence Rubyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-15T16:56:58Z
dc.date.available2014-09-15T16:56:58Z
dc.date.issued1954
dc.date.submitted1954
dc.identifier.otherb14656012
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/9001
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractIn the early part of the nineteenth century many children were employed in the coal mines of England and Scotland. By the early twentieth century this was no longer true. Between 1842 and 1920 several acts were passed by Parliament which regulated the work of children in mines. Before examining this legislation is is necessary to inquire how the children happened to be working in the mines in the first place. During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries the use of coal for various purposes greatly increased. This demand for coal increased the demand for workers in the mines. Since there was little movement of population to the mining centers this demand was met partly by the employment of children. In the early nineteenth century this employment of children was taken for granted, just as it had been for centuries. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.titleThe movement for the abolition of child labor in the mines of England. |c Boston University Graduate School dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, 1954.en_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePhilosophyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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