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dc.contributor.authorDooling, James Augustineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-08T19:54:52Z
dc.date.available2015-06-08T19:54:52Z
dc.date.issued1957
dc.date.submitted1957
dc.identifier.otherb14752840
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/11280
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractBeverly occupies a central position on Massachusetts' North Shore at the gateway to Cape Ann. A coastal Massachusetts location gave the town the advantage of early settlement (1626) and early incorporation (1668). The early settlement probably succeeded because the farmers could supplement their meagre earnings with fish from the nearby sea. The location was in part responsible for Revolutionary maritime prosperity and a spur to industrial development. The general geomorphology of Beverly consists of a group of northwesterly drumlins fronted by a serious of lower hills gradually descending in rolling send-plains and gravel terraces to the sea. Interestingly, the business district is perched on the summit of a hill, but the chief rival in the future to the well-established central business district may be the secondary business district at the northern base of the hill. [Truncated]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.titleSequent occupance and changing land use patterns in greater Beverly.en_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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