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dc.contributor.authorIngall, Manuelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-17T01:14:32Z
dc.date.available2017-02-17T01:14:32Z
dc.date.issued1951
dc.date.submitted1951
dc.identifier.otherb14737917
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/20550
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractAn antibiotic is an organic substance produced by a living organism which inhibits the growth of or kills some other living organism. Two of the more important antibiotics that have been studied are penicillin and streptomycin. Although three structural formulae for penicillin have been presented, this antibiotic is generally thought of as a ring condensation of two amino acids: alanine and betadimethylcysteine. The various penicillins differ in the substituent acid group coupled to the alanine amino group. Most investigators agree that penicillin produces striking and bizarre changes in the shape and size of various bacteria. The presence of elongated and swollen cells suggests the idea that growth takes place, but fission fails to follow. Other cultures contain cells which show a tendency to change from the normal three-dimensional colonies to the formation of "streptococcus-like" and "diplococcus-like" structures [TRUNCATED].en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.titleMode of action of antibioticsen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineBiologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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