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dc.contributor.authorRudolph, David Livingstonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-10T13:16:40Z
dc.date.available2017-04-10T13:16:40Z
dc.date.issued1958
dc.date.submitted1958
dc.identifier.otherb14754794
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/21052
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractThe main emphasis of the thesis is the importance of theocracy as a form of government. This is studied in the light of God's universal sovereignty as Calvin understands it in the word "delegation." This is different in form from the ideas of: "pure" theocracy - the sole rule of God, or "incarnate" theocracy - the presence of a ruler descended from a divine being; in that it is ordained, empowered, appointed by God and universal in concept even though different in form. The method of study is that of studying basic doctrines of each position; analyzing the particular governmental form; and finally, contrasting Calvin's position with the Old Testament, Aquinas' monarchical and Locke's democratic theocracies. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.titleThe theocratic basis of John Calvin's social philosophyen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePhilosophyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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