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dc.contributor.authorAlford, Daniel P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Jessica M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChapman, Sheila E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDubé, Catherine E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchadt, Robert W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSaitz, Richarden_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-29T21:02:15Z
dc.date.available2011-12-29T21:02:15Z
dc.date.copyright2008
dc.date.issued2008-3-6
dc.identifier.citationAlford, Daniel P, Jessica M Richardson, Sheila E Chapman, Catherine E Dubé, Robert W Schadt, Richard Saitz. "A web-based Alcohol Clinical Training (ACT) curriculum: Is in-person faculty development necessary to affect teaching?" BMC Medical Education 8:11. (2008)
dc.identifier.issn1472-6920
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/2495
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Physicians receive little education about unhealthy alcohol use and as a result patients often do not receive efficacious interventions. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether a free web-based alcohol curriculum would be used by physician educators and whether in-person faculty development would increase its use, confidence in teaching and teaching itself. METHODS: Subjects were physician educators who applied to attend a workshop on the use of a web-based curriculum about alcohol screening and brief intervention and cross-cultural efficacy. All physicians were provided the curriculum web address. Intervention subjects attended a 3-hour workshop including demonstration of the website, modeling of teaching, and development of a plan for using the curriculum. All subjects completed a survey prior to and 3 months after the workshop. RESULTS: Of 20 intervention and 13 control subjects, 19 (95%) and 10 (77%), respectively, completed follow-up. Compared to controls, intervention subjects had greater increases in confidence in teaching alcohol screening, and in the frequency of two teaching practices – teaching about screening and eliciting patient health beliefs. Teaching confidence and teaching practices improved significantly in 9 of 10 comparisons for intervention, and in 0 comparisons for control subjects. At follow-up 79% of intervention but only 50% of control subjects reported using any part of the curriculum (p = 0.20). CONCLUSION: In-person training for physician educators on the use of a web-based alcohol curriculum can increase teaching confidence and practices. Although the web is frequently used for disemination, in-person training may be preferable to effect widespread teaching of clinical skills like alcohol screening and brief intervention.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUS National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (R24 AA13822)en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.rightsCopyright 2008 Alford et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0
dc.titleA Web-Based Alcohol Clinical Training (ACT) Curriculum: Is In-Person Faculty Development Necessary to Affect Teaching?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6920-8-11
dc.identifier.pmid18325102
dc.identifier.pmcid2329623


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Copyright 2008 Alford et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright 2008 Alford et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.