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dc.contributor.authorCoppock, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorWechsler, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.editorHuang, M.en_US
dc.contributor.editorJaszcolt, K.en_US
dc.date2016-05-09
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-28T16:14:40Z
dc.date.available2018-03-28T16:14:40Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationCoppock, Elizabeth and Stephen Wechsler (to appear). The proper treatment of egophoricity in Kathmandu Newari. In Kasia M. Jaszczolt and Minyao Huang (eds.) Expressing the Self: Cultural Diversity and Cognitive Universals, Oxford University Press.
dc.identifier.isbn9780198786658
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/27880
dc.description.abstractWe develop a theory of so-called 'conjunct-disjunct marking', also known as 'egophoricity', in Kathmandu Newari. The signature pattern of egophoricity looks a bit like person agreement: In declaratives, there is a special marker that goes on first person verbs, but not second or third person (e.g. 'I drank-EGO too much'). But in interrogatives, the same marker goes on second person (e.g. 'Did you-EGO drink too much?'). This is called interrogative flip. Egophoric marking also interacts interestingly with the presence of evidential markers, and comes with an implication of knowing self-reference (emphasized in Newari by a restriction to volitional action). Our paper discusses two previous approaches, which we label indexical and evidential, and motivate our account, which we label egophoric. Along the way, we develop a theory of how de se attitudes are communicated.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://eecoppock.info/egophoricity-oup.pdf
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofExpressing the Self: Cultural Diversity and Cognitive Universals
dc.titleThe proper treatment of egophoricity in Kathmandu Newarien_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Romance Studiesen_US
pubs.publication-statusAccepteden_US


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