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dc.contributor.authorFox, Matthew Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorMaskew, Mhairien_US
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Alana Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Deniseen_US
dc.contributor.authorOnoya, Dorinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMalete, Givenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMacPhail, Patricken_US
dc.contributor.authorBassett, Jeanen_US
dc.contributor.authorEbrahim, Osmanen_US
dc.contributor.authorMabotja, Dikeledien_US
dc.contributor.authorMashamaite, Selloen_US
dc.contributor.authorLong, Lawrenceen_US
dc.contributor.authorSanne, Ianen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-30T19:32:08Z
dc.date.available2018-08-30T19:32:08Z
dc.date.copyright2017-06
dc.date.issued2017-06
dc.identifier.citationFox MP, Maskew M, Brennan AT, et al Cohort profile: the Right to Care Clinical HIV Cohort, South Africa BMJ Open 2017;7:bmjopen-2016-015620. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-015620
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/31125
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The research objectives of the Right to Care Clinical HIV Cohort analyses are to: (1) monitor treatment outcomes (including death, loss to follow-up, viral suppression and CD4 count gain among others) for patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART); (2) evaluate the impact of changes in the national treatment guidelines around when to initiate ART on HIV treatment outcomes; (3) evaluate the impact of changes in the national treatment guidelines around what ART regimens to initiate on drug switches; (4) evaluate the cost and cost-effectiveness of HIV treatment delivery models; (5) evaluate the need for and outcomes on second-line and third-line ART; (6) evaluate the impact of comorbidity with non-communicable diseases on HIV treatment outcomes and (7) evaluate the impact of the switch to initiating all patients onto ART regardless of CD4 count. PARTICIPANTS: The Right to Care Clinical HIV Cohort is an open cohort of data from 10 clinics in two provinces within South Africa. All clinics include data from 2004 onwards. The cohort currently has data on over 115 000 patients initiated on HIV treatment and patients are followed up every 3–6 months for clinical and laboratory monitoring. FINDINGS TO DATE: Cohort data includes information on demographics, clinical visit, laboratory data, medication history and clinical diagnoses. The data have been used to identify rates and predictors of first-line failure, to identify predictors of mortality for patients on second-line (eg, low CD4 counts) and to show that adolescents and young adults are at increased risk of unsuppressed viral loads compared with adults. FUTURE PLANS: Future analyses will inform national models of HIV care and treatment to improve HIV care policy in South Africa.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen_US
dc.rightsCopyright information: © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectRight to Careen_US
dc.subjectHIV/AIDSen_US
dc.subjectCD4 countsen_US
dc.subjectSouth Africaen_US
dc.subjectAntiretroviral therapyen_US
dc.titleCohort profile: the Right to Care Clinical HIV Cohort, South Africaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderFox MP, Maskew M, Brennan AT, et alen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2016-015620


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Copyright information: © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.
This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright information: © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/