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dc.contributor.authorBuzzella, Brianen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-25T12:44:58Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.submitted2012
dc.identifier.otherb38906764
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/31518
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractSame- and other-sex relationships involve similar patterns of development and are subject to similar predictors of relationship distress and dissolution; however, same-sex couples are subject to more varied and intense versions of these predictors (e.g., lack of support for the relationship). Negative relationship outcomes are associated with poorer mental and physical health highlighting the importance of couple-focused interventions to prevent relationship distress. Unfortunately, most programs were explicitly designed for other-sex couples. This project involved the initial evaluation of the acceptability and utility of a relationship education program specifically designed for same-sex couples. The intervention utilizes evidence-based techniques (e.g., communication training) as well as material thought to be especially relevant for same-sex couples (e.g., coping with discrimination). Twelve married or engaged male same-sex couples were randomized to either an immediate intervention ( N = 7) or waitlist (N = 5) condition. Those completing the intervention participated in a three month, post intervention, follow-up (N = 11). Although participants rated all intervention components as highly useful for enhancing their marriages, several recommendations for program refinement were suggested during an exit interview (e.g., increasing focus on sexual connection). Effect size estimates comparing change across the waitlist, reveal that involvement in the waitlist was associated with improvements in communication and problem solving, relationship outcomes (i.e., satisfaction, confidence, and quality), perceived support for the relationship, social support, perceived stress, and physical well-being. This may be a consequence of study assessment methodologies (e.g., engagement in a problem solving discussion) and/or the couple's decision to participate in a relationship education program. To examine the specific impact of the intervention, a series of effect sizes were calculated, each comparing data at post-waitlist and post-intervention (for the immediate treatment group only) time points. These results suggest that involvement in the intervention was associated with improvements in communication, relationship outcomes (i.e., satisfaction, confidence, and quality), perceived support for the relationship, social support, perceived stress, and mental well-being. Intervention effects were generally maintained three months later, suggesting that this program may result in lasting improvements in individual and relational outcomes. Future research will evaluate the intervention among a larger sample of couples.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleThe initial evaluation of a relationship education program for male same-sex couplesen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-01
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.barcode11719032086185
dc.identifier.mmsid99196028090001161


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