Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMoore, Taraen_US
dc.contributor.authorMowery, Jessica Raeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-10T20:08:17Z
dc.date.available2019-01-10T20:08:17Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/33043
dc.description.abstractThis experiment was designed to examine the effects of burning pig (Sus scrofa) remains on insect succession. Remains can be found burnt in a range of natural disasters including earthquakes, motor vehicle accidents, house fires, and brush fires. In homicides, more often than not, remains may be burnt to try and disguise the crime or destroy evidence. There has been little research conducted on the rate of insect succession at different levels of burning. This study will help to build upon the hypothesis that diverse levels of burning will each affect insect succession differently. The experiments took place in May 2017, and was repeated in August 2017. There were a total of three pigs used during this study, which were divided into quarters. Two quarters were used to represent each treatment level. One treatment remained unburnt and was used as a control in each experiment. The quarters were burnt at the research site in Holliston, MA. The Crow-Glassman Scale (CGS) was used to burn one treatment to level 2 and one treatment to level 3-4. They were then placed on site, no closer than five meters apart, surrounded by modified lobster cages and allowed to decompose. Notes, photographs, and insect collections took place every 2 hours on day 2 and twice a day for days 2 through 7. A final collection was then made on day 10 after the majority of tissue and insects were no longer present. The amount of insect activity was documented, photographs were taken, and samples were both preserved and reared through to adults. It was hypothesized that there was a correlation between insect activity and the level of burning. This was found to be true based on the results of this study, and with further research, will have the potential to aid in the determination of the post mortem interval (PMI) when burnt remains are found at the scene.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectEntomologyen_US
dc.subjectBurnt remainsen_US
dc.subjectCrow-glassman scaleen_US
dc.subjectSuccession ratesen_US
dc.titleInsect succession on decomposing remains: the effects of burningen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2018-10-25T19:04:11Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineForensic Anthropologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International