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dc.contributor.advisorTian, Leien_US
dc.contributor.authorGreene, Joseph Lewisen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-26T15:10:32Z
dc.date.available2019-11-26T15:10:32Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/38591
dc.description.abstractThere is an unprecedented need in neuroscience and medical research for the precise imaging of individual neurons and their interconnectivity in an effort to achieve a more complete understanding of neurological illness and cognitive growth. While several imaging architectures successfully detect active neural tissue, fluorescent imaging through head-mounted microscopes is becoming a standard method of imaging neural circuitry in freely behaving animals. At Boston University, the Gardner Group developed a miniaturized, open-source, single-photon ‘finch-scope’ to spur rapid prototyping in head-mounted miniscope technology. While experimentally convenient, the finch-scope and other miniscope platforms are limited by their native depth of field and may only detect a thin layer of active neurons in a neurological volume. In this Master’s Thesis Project, I will investigate utilizing optical phase masks integrated in the Fourier plane of the finch-scope to invoke a less-diffractive Bessel point spread function. Next, I will experimentally justify the extended depth of field nature of these phase masks by imaging the axial profile of a 10μm fluorescent pinhole object with a modified finch-scope.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectElectrical engineeringen_US
dc.subjectComputational imagingen_US
dc.subjectDiffractive opticsen_US
dc.subjectMiniscopeen_US
dc.subjectNeurophotonicsen_US
dc.subjectOptical engineeringen_US
dc.subjectPupil engineeringen_US
dc.titlePupil engineering in a miniaturized fluorescent microscopy platform using binary diffractive opticsen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2019-10-07T19:02:59Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineElectrical & Computer Engineeringen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-7825-4030


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