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dc.contributor.authorKafri, Rayanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-16T15:53:46Z
dc.date.available2019-12-16T15:53:46Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.submitted2011
dc.identifier.other(OCoLC)803623085
dc.identifier.other(OCoLC)803623085
dc.identifier.otherb38908931
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/38921
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: This work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community: please click Download and log in with a valid BU account to access. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (MSD) --Boston University, Goldman School of Dental Medicine, 2011 (Department of Restorative Sciences and Biomaterials).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographic references: leaves 74-83.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe success of root-canal treatment is dependent on the development and maintenance of the seal of the root-canal system. Endodontic research has been mainly oriented over the past decade on finding the best root-end filling material. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, MTA, has many favorable properties that support its clinical use. However, there are several drawbacks, which include the setting time of MTA, and the handling properties of MTA. In addition, when MTA is used as a root-end filling material, it may wash out of the preparation if special care is not taken. The manufacturer recommends mixing MTA with sterile water. This produces a grainy, sandy mixture, which is typically difficult to deliver to the required site and hard to compact adequately. Recently a thermoplastic synthetic resin polymer, Resilon/Epiphany system (RES), is emerging as a promising root canal obturation material and is gaining popularity among both endodontists and general practitioners. The manufacturer claims that RES has similar handling properties to gutta-percha, provides better flexural strength than gutta-percha, strengthens the root by more than 20%, and can be removed by solvents and heat. Because of its ability to provide an immediate, light-cured seal, RES can potentially offer certain advantages over other root-end filling materials in surgical endodontics. To date, the use of RES as a root-end filling material has not been explored. The purpose of this study is to compare the sealing of RES as a root-end filling material with Pro Root MTA using an in vitro fluid filtration protocol. The fluid transport model proposed by Dr. Ben Wu (Wu et al., 1993) offers several advantages over more commonly used techniques of assessing leakage. It has been suggested that the fluid transport model is both more sensitive than dye penetration for the detection of full-length voids along root canals and highly reproducible. Furthermore, since the specimens are not destroyed, it is possible to obtain measurements of microleakage of the sample at multiple time intervals. Forty extracted human incisors with mature apices were selected and sectioned using an Isomet 2000 (Buehler, Lake Bluff, IL). To standardize the research project, teeth were sectioned in the middle of the root to obtain 5 mm sections. Then the root sections were placed in acrylic tubes and filled with MTA (20 samples) or Resilon (20 samples). After the samples were set, leakage was measured via a fluid filtration apparatus. A forty-outlet manifold was used to test multiple specimens simultaneously. All of the parts were connected using high-pressure-rated couplings to ensure against the possibility of leakage. An air bubble was introduced into the outlet tube via a small gauge hypodermic needle, and then pressure was turned on. Linear displacement of the air bubble was observed against a ruler with l mm increments. Measurements were taken of each group at the following time intervals: every 3 days for 90 days. In this study samples were not sacrificed and fluid filtration was measured over time. Data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) at 95% confidence intervals (p[less than]0.05) for statistical significance. The results of this study indicate that Resilon/Epiphany was equivalent, but not superior to Mineral Trioxide Aggregate.The current study found no significant differences in fluid leakage for MTA compared to the Resilon/ Epiphany system.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.subjectRoot canal filling materialsen_US
dc.titleComparison of in vitro leakage of Resilon and mineral trioxide aggregateen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Science in Dentistryen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineRestorative Sciences and Biomaterialsen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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